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The Green List 2010

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Articles - June 2010
Wednesday, May 26, 2010

The 2010 list of Oregon’s Best Green Companies to Work For is all about diversity and commitment. Winners range from longtime sustainability gurus such as Gerding Edlen and the Bonneville Environmental Foundation to newcomers such as Ruby Receptionists and Hummingbird Wholesale. Add in respected businesses that are always expanding their green programs such as SOLARC Architecture and Boly Welch Recruiting, and the final result offers diverse representation of a statewide trend toward more sustainable business practices. — THE EDITORS

For more on the survey methods, please click here

2010
2009
COMPANY/
ORGANIZATION
WEBSITE
CITY
SCORE
DESCRIPTION

1

1

Gerding Edlen

gerdingedlen.com

Portland

294.10

Real estate development and property management

2

NR

Research Into Action

researchintoaction.com

Portland

293.60

Research and evaluation consulting

3

28

Standing Stone Brewing Co.

standingstonebrewing.com

Ashland

291.23

Restaurant and brewery

4

NR

Bonneville Envir. Foundation

b-e-f.org

Portland

289.90

Development of renewable energy and watershed restoration

5

2

Kimpton Hotels Portland

kimptonhotels.com

Portland

289.60

Hotel

6

4

Isler CPA

IslerCPA.com

Eugene

288.60

CPA firm

7

NR

Adelante Mujeres

adelantemujeres.org

Forest Grove

288.53

Educating and promoting enterprise for children and adults

8

12

SOLARC Architecture & Engineering

solarc-ae.net

Eugene

285.90

Integrated architecture and engineering

9

NR

Neil Kelly Company

neilkelly.com

Portland

284.90

Residential/light commercial remodeling, custom new homes

10

9

Vernier Software & Technology

vernier.com

Beaverton

284.60

Manufacture and sale of educational science/math technology

11

NR

Hummingbird Wholesale

hummingbirdwholesale.com

Eugene

284.33

Wholesale organic bulk foods

12

3

Doubletree Hotel, Portland

portlandlloydcenter.doubletree.com

Portland

282.00

Hotel, lodging and hospitality

13

6

Sokol Blosser Winery

sokolblosser.com

Dundee

280.16

Viineyard, winery and tasting room

14

39

Portland Business Alliance

portlandalliance.com

Portland

279.70

Greater Portland’s leading business association

15

37

Portland Energy Conservation Inc.

peci.org

Portland

279.10

Research and design of energy efficiency programs

16

NR

Microsoft Corporation

microsoft.com

Portland

277.70

Software sales and services

17

NR

Oregon Environmental Council

oeconline.org

Portland

277.29

Safeguarding clean air, water and land, and healthy food

18

NR

The Cadmus Group

cadmusgroup.com

Portland

276.83

Environmental consulting: water, energy, communications, etc.

19

NR

Ruby Receptionists

callruby.com

Portland

276.16

Virtual receptionist company

20

39

Boly:Welch Recruiting

bolywelch.com

Portland

275.29

Recruiting and staffing



Click through for the next group of listings.




 

Comments   

 
April
0 #1 Terrible Rank DiscrepanciesApril 2010-06-15 11:02:18
I noticed that you have a number of discrepancies in your ranking strategy and I'm quite frankly appalled at your lack of proofing and editing. Some of the time ties are denoted (correctly) by duplicating the rank followed by the next appropriate number had no tie existed (i.e. 34th, 34th, 36th). Other times you (erroneously) list the same score with different ranks (i.e. 38th - 270.4, 39th - 270.4).
This should be an embarrassment to your magazine as it significantly reduces the credibility of your survey. Next year I hope you have your ducks in a row prior to the publication date.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Brandon Sawyer
0 #2 Rank discrepanciesBrandon Sawyer 2010-06-15 17:58:37
Thanks for bringing this to our attention. The cause of the discrepancies was that differences in score were obscured by rounding scores up to one decimal point. I have updated the online list with scores carried out to two digits so you can see accurate differences in score that correspond to the ranks. Next year, we will ensure that the list presented to all readers shows enough information to make sense of the rankings.

I'm sorry for any negative impression it may have given about the survey.

Thanks again for your diligent reading of the list.
Quote | Report to administrator
 

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