Sponsored by Energy Trust

Bend Research reinvents itself under CEO Rod Ray

| Print |  Email
Articles - May 2010
Friday, April 16, 2010
_ND35988
BEND RESEARCH
bendres.com
CEO: Rod Ray
FOUNDED: 1975
2009 GROSS REVENUES: under $30 million
EMPLOYEES: 159
FUN FACT: 18 employees have Ph.D.s
PHOTOS BY JON MEYERS

You could say Rod Ray’s high-school sweetheart got him where he is today. Her father, then owner of Bend Research, gave Ray a summer job building an 1,800-foot post-and-rail fence around the 40-acre Tumalo property to keep out cows.

The fence is long gone (as is the sweetheart), but Ray is not. He kept coming back to work at Bend Research every summer and Christmas vacation during his undergrad years at Oregon State University. He returned permanently after getting a Ph.D. in chemical engineering and has spent his entire 27-year career working for Bend Research in development, chemical engineering and directing the engineering department.

Now as CEO he is reinventing the company’s business model to make Bend Research a leader in pharmaceutical drug-delivery research.

Bend Research, founded in 1975, specializes in developing ways that make it possible for drugs to enter the body and go to the places they are meant to treat. “A lot of those drugs have physical properties that make them quite difficult to work in your body,” Ray says. Those problems include not being able to dissolve in water, be digested by the body or be released over a period of time.

Bend Research worked exclusively for the pharmaceutical giant Pfizer between 1994 and 2008, when it grew from $10 million to $40 million in annual revenue with state-of-the-art facilities and research capabilities.

Ray, 54, became CEO in 2008. Two weeks later, Pfizer ended its contract with Bend Research as a result of consolidation and downsizing. Ray suddenly was confronted by the daunting challenge of needing to immediately grow Bend Research’s clientele from nothing.

Pfizer gave Bend Research the rights to technologies it had developed. “I didn’t know at the time how truly fair Pfizer was going to be to us,” Ray says. “If they had not done those things, we wouldn’t have grown fast enough to thrive.”

But Bend Research wasn’t yet out of deep business weeds. “Our new business without Pfizer, I knew, would be different.” Ray says. Costs were cut 25% by eliminating 25 positions and extraneous departments. Bend Research now employs 159 people. Initial clients resulted from connections made through Pfizer, and it was critical to create a quality product that would retain those clients for future projects.

“We worked our rear ends off,” says Ray.

_ND35876
_ND35918
_ND36062

It’s paid off. In 2008, 100% of revenues came from Pfizer. In the first quarter of 2009, it was 5%. Bend Research now has 40 clients; almost all of them are repeat customers and hail from the East Coast, Europe and China. Ray estimates gross revenues this year will be more than $30 million. That’s under the $40 million mark it had during the Pfizer years, but Ray predicts steady growth. “The key to growth is doing high-quality work for the clients we have,” he says.

Ray uses what he calls the “alliance model” of working with a client. Bend Research works closely with the pharmaceutical company to improve a drug’s capabilities instead of being an isolated contractor. “We always try to work on a drug in a team rather than on our own,” he says. “It works better to work with the client who knows their drug really well, and we know technology real well.”

And it makes Bend Research “a line item in their budget.”

Future growth will not only result from maintaining long-term relationships with clients, but also marketing Bend Research as a problem-solving company.

“The real key is deciding what problem you are trying to solve on a particular drug. Sometimes they appear to be insoluble, but they won’t go through the wall of your body. That’s a permeability problem,” Ray says. “If you’re not solving the right problem, you’re wasting everyone’s time and money.”

Ray is also considering expanding the company’s offerings. Bend Research is adding a 15,000-square-foot building that will be used for small-scale commercial manufacturing. “Right now…we only make supplies for the testing phase,” he says. “But the key is to advance [the drug companies'] medicines toward the markets. It’s satisfying because their medicines are being used to cure diseases.” 

AMANDA WALDROUPE
 

More Articles

Growing a mobility cluster

News
Friday, October 31, 2014
0414 bikes bd2f6052BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

Why are there so few transportation startups in Portland?  The city’s leadership in bike, transit and pedestrian transportation has been well-documented.  But that was then — when government and nonprofits paved the way for a new, less auto centric way of life.


Read more...

The short list: Holiday habits of six Oregon CEOs

The Latest
Thursday, December 11, 2014
121214-xmaslist1BY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

We ask business and nonprofit leaders how they survive the season.


Read more...

A Complex Portrait: Immigration, Jobs and the Economy

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JOE ROJAS-BURKE & KIM MOORE

Oregon Business reports on the visa squeeze, the skills gap and foreign-born residents who are revitalizing rural Oregon.


Read more...

Corner Office: Sheree Arntson

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

Checking in with the managing director of Arnerich Massena.


Read more...

Corner Office: Pam Edstrom

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

Seven tidbits of information from an agency partner and co-founder of Waggener Edstrom in Lake Oswego.


Read more...

Streetfight

News
Sunday, December 07, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

On Friday, Uber switched on an app — and with one push of the button torpedoed Portland’s famed public process.


Read more...

Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS