March 2010

Secrets to employee satisfaction

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Articles - March 2010
Thursday, February 25, 2010

What do the Top 10 Best Companies do that keeps their employees motivated, loyal and upbeat? It’s as big as paying 100% of health care insurance and as small as a contest for the ugliest shirt. And let’s not forget the free massage.

 

The 100 Best Companies: By the numbers

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Articles - March 2010
Thursday, February 25, 2010
100Bchart5

Private companies dominate the 100 Best Companies this year, as does the professional service sector. We specifically crunched the numbers on health benefits, with our analysis showing that robust health care plans were important to being a Best Company.

 

Best companies provide care, leadership and fun

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Articles - March 2010
Thursday, February 25, 2010

100119Stamp41There were nearly 20,000 employees from 303 companies who participated in our 17th annual 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon survey. It might not have been the best year for business, with a bad economy hanging on, but you wouldn’t know it by how our 2010 winners treated their employees.

 

No housing in Pendleton

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Articles - March 2010
Thursday, February 25, 2010

A housing shortage in Pendleton is keeping some businesses from being able to recruit workers, and officials say the shortage is hampering the town’s growth.

 

Local designer leads sewing revolution

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Articles - March 2010
Thursday, February 25, 2010

sewingKnown as McCall Pattern Company's "fit expert," Pati Palmer is a top-selling pattern designer and sewing industry leader.

 

Oregon's romance industry grows

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Articles - March 2010
Thursday, February 25, 2010

aplacetolandcoverWith a growing publishing house in Baker City, a top book review website out of Hillsboro and thriving communities of about 180 writers in Salem and Portland, Oregon is grabbing a slice of the $1.36 billion romance-fiction market.

 

Mercy Corps misses out on text giving

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Articles - March 2010
Thursday, February 25, 2010

Haiti_QuakeDay9_FoodDist526The Red Cross has raised about $255 million for Haiti, $32 million of it, 12.5%, by text message. Mercy Corps, which is much smaller, has raised $11.4 million from donors via the web, phone and in-person donations. But nothing by text.

 
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Old school: Paulsen's Pharmacy maintains old fashion ethos

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VIDEO: Under the radar — complete with a soda counter, the traditional Paulsen's Pharmacy looks to compete with big box retailers.


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Leading with the right brain

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On the eve of the Portland Ad Federation's Rosey Awards, Matt Anderson, CEO of Struck, talks about the transition from creative director to CEO, the Portland talent pool and whether data is the new black in the creative services sector.


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Editor's Letter: Power Play

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There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


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Streetfight

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On Friday, Uber switched on an app — and with one push of the button torpedoed Portland’s famed public process.


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