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March 2010

Portland developer builds app business

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Articles - March 2010
Thursday, February 25, 2010

OBMRavenZachary-115Small Society founder Raven Zachary realized that the money was not in writing your own killer app and reaping profits from the App Store, but in building apps for other people who want to get in on the action.

 

Precision Castparts grows with 15th acquisition

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Articles - March 2010
Thursday, February 25, 2010

Oregon’s fastest-growing public company has grown even more formidable — and complicated — with its recent acquisition of a 49% share in Yangzhou Chengde Steel Tube Co. of Jiangsu Province, China.

 

"Economic gardening" nurtures small businesses

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Articles - March 2010
Thursday, February 25, 2010

Economic developers are beginning to focus on growing Oregon’s small businesses by targeting those with a potential for quick growth and sharing tactical information typically sourced only by big businesses.

 

Oregon's first crafts guild launches

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Articles - March 2010
Thursday, February 25, 2010

Oregon’s first guild comprised of historic preservation craftsmen is expected to be launched this month providing craftspeople with networking and marketing opportunities to attract new business.

 

Stagecraft Industries serves Northwest productions

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Articles - March 2010
Thursday, February 25, 2010

stagelightColorful samples of velour curtains, lighting tracks and pulley systems in Stagecraft Industries’ offices are hints to the company’s work: producing the backstage infrastructure that makes the magic of musicals and plays across the Northwest.

 

Intel hones green-power strategy

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Articles - March 2010
Thursday, February 25, 2010

Intel’s announcement that it will install solar power systems at four locations nationwide including Hillsboro represents the company’s most recent tactic in a sweeping global strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

 

Laika plans next act after successful year

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Articles - March 2010
Friday, February 26, 2010

travisRegardless of how Coraline fares at the Academy Awards, it has been a triumphant awards season for independent animation studio Laika.

 
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Dan and Louis Oyster Bar opens up to a changing neighborhood

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Thursday, December 11, 2014
121114-oystervidBy MEGHAN NOLT

VIDEO: Revamping a Classic — an iconic eatery stays relevant in a changing marketplace.


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Streetfight

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Sunday, December 07, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

On Friday, Uber switched on an app — and with one push of the button torpedoed Portland’s famed public process.


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OB Poll: Wineries and groceries

News
Friday, October 24, 2014

24-winethumbA majority of respondents agreed: Local vineyards should remain Oregon-owned and quality is the most important factor when determining where to eat or buy groceries.


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Legislative Preview: A Shifting Balance

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014
BY APRIL STREETER

Democratic gains pave the way for a revival of environment and labor bills as revenue reform languishes.


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Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


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Free Falling

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, December 18, 2014
121714-oilprice-thumbBY JASON NORRIS | OB CONTRIBUTOR

The implosion of the energy complex: The best thing for low oil prices is low oil prices.


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Kill the Meeting

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

Meetings get a bad rap. A few local companies make them count.


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