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Employees on not-so-great workplaces

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Articles - March 2010
Thursday, February 25, 2010

Companies can often learn more about their workplaces issues from negative comments than from praise. Here’s a sampling from some of the 100 Best employee surveys of what doesn’t work, even from some of the best workplaces in the state.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY MARTIN GEE
notsogreatlaptop

“I would love to see more women in senior leadership.”

“We could become a little more environmentally friendly.”

“The only thing I want to see improved is to get the business picked up again.”

“The coffee-pot policy needs improvement.”

“The employee reviews and pay increases! Once every three years is a long stretch for a review and pay increase.”

“We seriously need to replace our laptops.”

“Softer toilet paper?”

“The right hand doesn’t know what the left is doing.”
“The teamwork here sucks and the saying that it always runs downhill is very true here. Job security is not even an option.”

“There does not seem to be a connection between workers and the owners.”

“They really need to step up and start paying us what we are worth. It’s nearly impossible to buy a house and start a family with these wages.”

“Micromanagement is everywhere, and employees are treated like children.”

“Management belittles staff. Improve this!”

“Supervisors seem to be able to get away with bad behavior and people will look the other way.”
“They intentionally push management and workers to do unethical or unsafe practices to sustain high profitability.”

“Stop lying!”

notsogreathands“I would like to have a CEO that knew what he was doing and really cared about the product we produce. Our product is going downhill fast.”

“My company needs to modernize the good ol’ boy ways. A lot of the departmental managers need to work on treating women with as much respect as the men.”

“My children are not covered for immunizations or yearly checkups. This cost me over $1,000 this month and I am already paying over $600 a month for a program that doesn’t even include vision. It makes me physically ill to think about it.”

“The only way to secure an equitable salary is to quit the company and come back at the market rate. Opportunities for advancement within the company are non-existent.”

“The pay at this company is terrible. I could make more working at a McDonald’s. The company makes so much money but does not share it with the workers.”

 

Comments   

 
Bill
0 #1 Sounds Like Harry and DavidBill 2010-04-02 15:27:46
Did they pull all of these quotes from the Harry and David file? What a terrible company!
Quote | Report to administrator
 

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