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The 2010 List: 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon

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Articles - March 2010
Thursday, February 25, 2010

NUMBER THREE:

SMALL COMPANIES Companies with fewer than 50 employees worldwide
RANK '10 RANK '09 COMPANY CITY
HEADQUARTERS
OREGON SENIOR EXEC / TITLE
EMPLOYEES:
OR / TOTAL
BUSINESS SURVEY SCORE:
EMPLOYEE EMPLOYER
TOTAL SCORE
3 17 Stamp-Connection Gresham
John Clark
President
15
15
Rubber stamp and engraving manufacturer 467.1
61.5
528.64


Stamp-Connection // No. 3 Small Company

Stamp-Connection owner John Clark is proud that his stamp manufacturing business can take orders as late as 3 in the afternoon and still ship the next morning. His top priority, however, is his employees. “They are the key to growth,” Clark says.

None of Gresham-based Stamp-Connection’s 15 employees were laid off during the recession, and no benefits were cut. Employees can count on a guaranteed 3% cost of living increase in April, and a merit-based raise ranging from 3% to 10% in October. That raise is based on an employee evaluation discussed one-on-one between Clark and each employee.

“We…make sure there are no misunderstandings,” Clark says. “We’re all on the same page here.” “No one’s on a totem pole,” says Jon Morse, a typesetter.

Employees make analogies to family when describing the camaraderie and tension-free work environment. Everyone plays on a softball team, belong to the Eagles Lodge and is free to bring their dogs or children to work. A group including Clark is looking forward to quitting smoking together and providing a work-based support group.

“There’s no person here who doesn’t like another person,” says office manager Serene Brown.


-AMANDA WALDROUPE

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