The 2010 List: 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon

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Articles - March 2010
Thursday, February 25, 2010

100 BEST METHODOLOGY

EMPLOYEE SURVEY

The survey is voluntary and free of charge. Participating private and public companies, nonprofits and government agencies must have at least 15 Oregon employees at the time of taking the survey. Employers are categorized as small if they have 15-49 employees worldwide; medium if they employ 50-249; and large if they employ 250 or more. For the 2010 survey nearly 20,000 Oregon workers rated their satisfaction with 303 employers in 50 workplace qualities — 10 in each of the following categories:
1. Benefits and compensation: health coverage, fitness and wellness, retirement plan, compensation, employee retention.
2. Work environment: scheduling, diversity, family balance, teamwork, fun, technology, community work, policies and procedures.
3. Decision-making and trust: collaboration and cooperation, creativity, trust and openness, organizational pride, ethical standards.
4. Performance management: performance feedback and goals, employee accountability, rewards and acknowledgement.
5. Career development and learning: opportunities, promotions, employee training, educational support, management diversity and communications.

EMPLOYER BENEFITS SURVEY

Company representatives answered more than 50 questions covering a comprehensive set of benefits including health and wellness, time off, family-friendly policies, work scheduling, incentives, retirement plans and culture.

SCORING

The employee survey counts for 5/6 of a company's score. For each company, the average employee rating is calculated in each of the five categories on a scale of 0-100. The employer benefits survey is also scored on a 100-point scale, accounting for the remaining 1/6 of the overall score, and resulting in a total possible score of 600.

HOW TO ENTER THE 100 BEST

1. Eligibility: Any private or public company, subsidiary or division, nonprofit or government agency with at least 15 Oregon-based, regular employees is eligible to enter the survey. The organization may be headquartered outside the state.
2. Survey period: The process for 2010's list will begin in August and end in November 2010. There is no charge to participate, and companies that do not make the list will remain anonymous. All participants that complete the process can obtain survey results.
3. Submitting your company: Send an e-mail with the name, title, phone number and e-mail address of the person who will act as the 100 Best contact to: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . .
4. Mark your calendar: The survey sign-up link will also be posted to www.oregon100best.com in August.

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