The 2010 List: 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon

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Articles - March 2010
Thursday, February 25, 2010

NUMBER TWO:

LARGE COMPANIES Companies with 250 or more employees worldwide
RANK '10 RANK '09 COMPANY CITY
HEADQUARTERS
OREGON SENIOR EXEC / TITLE
EMPLOYEES:
OR / TOTAL
BUSINESS SURVEY SCORE:
EMPLOYEE EMPLOYER
TOTAL SCORE
2 1 Hitachi Consulting Portland
Dallas, Texas
Mike Broberg
Vice President
30
2,000
Management and technology consulting 450.5
76.9
527.42

Hitachi Consulting // No. 2 Large Company

Pay and benefits at this Portland-based IT and business consulting company are "fair," in the understated words of Vice President Mike Broberg. Employees are entitled to 30 days of paid time off, paternity and maternity leave, comprehensive dental and health including alternative care, and so on. But the things that make Hitachi Consulting a great place to work are harder to quantify.

Camaraderie, for one. Hitachi's 30 employees overwhelmingly cite "the fun people," "the wonderful people," and "the smartest, [most] hard-working, talented people in Portland" as the reason they love their jobs. Employees eat lunch together in the conference room every day. They also have dinner together, hit happy hour together and compete against each other during Funquest, a citywide scavenger hunt — all archived in a mosaic of photos tacked to the hallway wall.

Empowerment, for another. Junior employees get 300 hours of training a year on average. A group of employees from the lowest to the top levels decides how to spend the generous community philanthropy budget. "We enable and encourage those in the office to be involved and define what that looks like and own it," Broberg says. "As a result they're more happy with it."

-ADRIANNE JEFFRIES
Untitled Document

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