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The 2010 List: 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon

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Articles - March 2010
Thursday, February 25, 2010

Our annual ranking of the 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon turns 17 this year with nearly 20,000 employees participating. Oregon Business research editor Brandon Sawyer and research partner Davis, Hibbitts & Midghall calculated the rankings based on confidential employee surveys and a benefits report completed by each company.

NUMBER ONE:

LARGE COMPANIES Companies with 250 or more employees worldwide
RANK '10 RANK '09 COMPANY CITY
HEADQUARTERS
OREGON SENIOR EXEC / TITLE
EMPLOYEES:
OR / TOTAL
BUSINESS SURVEY SCORE:
EMPLOYEE EMPLOYER
TOTAL SCORE
1 7 Microsoft Corporation Portland
Redmond, Wash.
Chris Preston
ATU Sales Manager
49
91,469
Software sales and services 455.9
82.2
538.11

Microsoft // No. 1 Large Company

Here's one company where you won't hear the usual gripe about needing new laptops. Employees at Microsoft's sales and customer service branch in Portland are using software so cutting edge it hasn't been released yet. That means these 49 tech-savvy employees work from home whenever they want without customers knowing the difference.

"Microsoft cares much more about quality of work, impact you have and value you bring," says Chris Preston, Northwest sales manager. "Where you do that work is not important."

Letting employees work in their PJs shows the faith Microsoft has in its workforce. Employees have autonomy (and accountability) in dealing with clients, who happen to be some of the biggest firms in town. The lofty clientele means employees have "an outsized impact," Preston says. One worker writes, "I get the chance every day to change the world for the better."

Microsoft treats its employees like royalty. Benefits are excellent (employees can call a doctor at any hour for a phone consultation or home visit to avoid the emergency room) and Microsoft pays employees for volunteer work of their choice and matches their charitable donations, up to $12,000 a year each. 

-ADRIANNE JEFFRIES

Click through to the next page for the number two Large Company 2010!

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