Home Back Issues March 2010 Oregon's first crafts guild launches

Oregon's first crafts guild launches

| Print |  Email
Articles - March 2010
Thursday, February 25, 2010

Craftsmen and economic developers in Clatsop County are putting to work the pride they have for living in the oldest settled area west of the Mississippi.

Oregon’s first guild comprised of historic preservation craftsmen is expected to be launched this month providing craftspeople — including fine woodworkers, tile makers, roofers and stained-glass blowers — with networking and marketing opportunities to attract new business. Of the 72 businesses involved in historic preservation work, 32 are interested in being guild members, which has annual dues of $350.

“We would like to establish this region … as a center for excellence in historic preservation,” says John Goodenberger, a local historian and writer.

Rick Gardner, the executive director of Clatsop Economic Development Resources, says the effort is designed to create an economic cluster in historic preservation that will brand Astoria, the rest of Clatsop County and Washington’s Pacific County as the geographic area with the most expertise in the Pacific Northwest in historic preservation. “We’re trying a cluster approach that looks at businesses and industries that we think are naturally advantaged by our region,” he says.

The hope is also to retain and create jobs not only in the craftsman industry, but related industries in retail and construction. “There’s a lot of historic buildings in Astoria,” says architect of Jay Raskin, the owner of Ecola Architects. “There already is a trend of restoring buildings.”

Raskin is also an adjunct faculty member of Clatsop Community College’s new historic preservation program. The certification program began in the fall of 2009. Raskin says the College was expecting to have up to six full-time students, but enrollment increased in the winter term to 25 full- or part-time students.

One of the hopes for the academic program, says Ed Overbay, owner of Overbay Houseworks in Warrenton, is that it will complement the guild’s efforts to beef up jobs.

Overbay specializes in fine woodworking. He has laid off 70% of his workforce in the last year, and says his sales have dropped by the same amount.

“I think we’ll have a better chance of surviving if we work together,” Overbay says.


AMANDA WALDROUPE
 

More Articles

The 100 Best Companies survey is open

News
Friday, October 24, 2014

100-best-logo-2015 500pxw-1How does your workplace stack up against competitors? How can you improve workplace practices to help recruit and retain employees? Find out by taking our 100 Best Companies to Work for in Oregon survey!


Read more...

Gone Girl

News
Monday, September 29, 2014
roundup-logo-thumb-14BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

Wehby disappears, Kitzhaber fails to disclose and Seattle gets bike share before Portland.


Read more...

Powerlist: Colleges and Universities

September 2014
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

A conversation about higher education with the presidents of the University of Oregon and Clackamas Community College, followed by September's powerlist.


Read more...

Two Sides of the Coin

Contributed Blogs
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
22 twosidesBY JASON NORRIS

Historically, when the leaves fall, so do the markets. This year, earnings, Europe, energy and Ebola have in common? Beyond alliteration, they are four factors that the investors are pointing to for this year’s seasonal volatility.


Read more...

The 100 Best Nonprofits to Work for in Oregon 2014

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
14BY KIM MOORE

Proud, diverse and underpaid.

Pride in their organizations’ mission, fairness in the treatment of women and ethnic minorities, flexible work schedules — these are just a handful of workplace characteristics that employees of this year’s 100 Best Nonprofits appreciate about their organizations.


Read more...

Constant Contact

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

To prevent burnout, companies are banning email and after-hours communications. But is the 24-hour workday here to stay?


Read more...

Back to School

September 2014
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
BY LEE VAN DER VOO

By now we’ve all read the headlines: Starbucks is giving away free degrees. Except it isn’t.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS