February 2010

Consumers go for cheaper burials

| Print |  Email
Articles - February 2010
Thursday, January 21, 2010

Funeral directors report more and more people are making cheaper choices when choosing arrangements for their deceased.

 

Credit unions gain market share from banks

| Print |  Email
Articles - February 2010
Thursday, January 21, 2010

Plenty of Oregon banks are still reeling, but the state’s credit unions are flush with cash.

 

Overgrown, grass seed farmers switch to wheat

| Print |  Email
Articles - February 2010
Thursday, January 21, 2010

Wheat2Converting to more profitable crops can be a smart move for farmers in rough economic times, and grass seed farmers are doing just that by growing wheat.

 

Cold freezes olive oil dreams

| Print |  Email
Articles - February 2010
Thursday, January 21, 2010

Bigger-OlivesOregon’s newest crop experiment, which growers hope will be as successful as Oregon Pinot Noir, may not have survived the winter.

 

Pellet market smoldering

| Print |  Email
Articles - February 2010
Thursday, January 21, 2010

BNK-FP-ScreenWood pellets are looking like the next big thing in Oregon’s campaign to create green jobs. Or are they?

 

Good crab season boosts coastal economy

| Print |  Email
Articles - February 2010
Thursday, January 21, 2010

crab1The economic impact of the state’s Dungeness crab fishery in December alone was about $55 million, a welcome jolt for coastal towns from Astoria to Brookings.

 

Convergence Networks survives recession by planning ahead

| Print |  Email
Articles - February 2010
Thursday, January 21, 2010

CONVERGENCE1cAfter two years of improving operations, honing the company’s focus and firing the worst customers, CEO David Murray is confident that Convergence Networks will grow steadily into the future.

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 Next > End >>

Page 3 of 4

More Articles

Fly Zone

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JOE ROJAS-BURKE

The black soldier fly’s larvae are among the most ravenous and least picky eaters on earth.


Read more...

See How They Run

January-Powerbook 2015
Friday, December 12, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Studying ground-running birds, a group that ranks among nature's speediest and most agile bipedal runners, to build a faster robot.


Read more...

Kill the Meeting

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

Meetings get a bad rap. A few local companies make them count.


Read more...

Corner Office: Marv LaPorte

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

The president of LaPorte & Associates lets us in on his day-to-day life.


Read more...

Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


Read more...

Tackling the CEO-worker pay gap

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014
BY OREGON BUSINESS STAFF

An SEC rule targets the disparity between executive and employee compensation, reigniting a long-standing debate about corporate social responsibility.


Read more...

Behind the curtain: What students should know about accreditation and rankings

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, December 04, 2014
120414-edurating-thumbBY DEBRA RINGOLD | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

How important are institutional and/or program evaluations provided by third parties in selecting a college or university program?


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS