Sponsored by Energy Trust
January 2010

Eugene real-estate company grabs new markets

| Print |  Email
Articles - January 2010
Thursday, December 17, 2009

GorillaGorilla Capital, a Eugene-based buyer and seller of foreclosed homes, has expanded into Arizona, Idaho, southwest Washington and Florida as part of a broad strategy to become the dominant national player in distressed residential real estate.

 

New publishing platform helps comic book artists

| Print |  Email
Articles - January 2010
Thursday, December 17, 2009

Shishkaboom-WebsiteTwo entrepreneurs in Portland say their comic book publishing platform will predict and deliver content fans want to buy and read. The magic principle behind the platform: democracy.

 

Sykes layoffs anticipated

| Print |  Email
Articles - January 2010
Thursday, December 17, 2009

The Sykes Enterprises call center in Milton-Freewater is easily the city’s largest private employer, drawing about 520 workers from Umatilla County and Walla Walla across the border. So there was major concern in November when the company announced it expected to lay off 336 employees on Jan. 15.

 

Roseburg gets an incubator

| Print |  Email
Articles - January 2010
Thursday, December 17, 2009

Light-BulbsCity officials in Roseburg have tried mightily but without much luck to diversify the local economy. But a recent $2.75 million federal grant and an ambitious plan to lure technology startups may change that.

 

Portland works toward efficient lighting

| Print |  Email
Articles - January 2010
Thursday, December 17, 2009

IMG_7693City agreements with power companies and an inability to adequately measure components of its lighting infrastructure may be blocking a way for Portland to reduce energy and save money.

 

Helping farmers maximize crops

| Print |  Email
Articles - January 2010
Thursday, December 17, 2009

DSC00661Every season farmers must contend with shifting crop markets as they look for the best outlet for their produce. But Randy Morrow hopes to ease some of that uncertainty with his new family business called eProduceSales.com.

 

Cruise ship business flounders in Astoria

| Print |  Email
Articles - January 2010
Thursday, December 17, 2009

cruiseThe city of Astoria is bracing for a substantial hit to its local economy because it is losing half its cruise ship business.

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 Next > End >>

Page 2 of 3

More Articles

Fly Zone

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JOE ROJAS-BURKE

The black soldier fly’s larvae are among the most ravenous and least picky eaters on earth.


Read more...

Free Falling

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, December 18, 2014
121714-oilprice-thumbBY JASON NORRIS | OB CONTRIBUTOR

The implosion of the energy complex: The best thing for low oil prices is low oil prices.


Read more...

The 100 Best Companies survey is open

News
Friday, October 24, 2014

100-best-logo-2015 500pxw-1How does your workplace stack up against competitors? How can you improve workplace practices to help recruit and retain employees? Find out by taking our 100 Best Companies to Work for in Oregon survey!


Read more...

The short list: 5 companies making a mint off kale

The Latest
Thursday, November 20, 2014
kale-thumbnailBY OB STAFF

Farmers, grocery stores and food processors cash in on kale.


Read more...

Shifting Ground

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JOE ROJAS-BURKE

Bans on genetically modified crops create uncertainty for farmers.


Read more...

Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


Read more...

Crowdfunding 2.0

News
Tuesday, December 02, 2014
120214-crowdfund-thumbBY LINDA BAKER

A conversation with attorney Erich Merrill about the latest way to raise money from large groups of people.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS