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Archives - December 2009
Friday, November 20, 2009

pompom

Life stinks, so La Grande inventor David Foggia decided to develop the Undetectable Nasal Insert (UNI). Approved by the FDA in 2007 as a non-medical device, Foggia says this odor-killing device is as simple as it is effective. Two furry balls at the end of a monofilament line are placed in the nostrils to control smells. And the UNI are so tiny, they’re perfect for health workers not wanting to distract or offend patients. But Foggia has bigger plans for his invention. In August, he applied for emergency approval from the FDA for use as a pathogen destroyer and flu vaccine delivery system. Foggia says the review is pending. Requiring lower dosages with greater control against allergic reactions, he says the UNI will be safer and less wasteful than injections or FluMist. “[With the] nasal mucosa, you have access to 90% of the body’s immune system cells,” says Foggia. “Injectables only give you 10%.” Foggia says many pharmaceutical companies are too invested in adjuvants — chemicals mixed with vaccine injections to magnify the potency. The UNI forgoes the additives because nasal delivery is more effective. Awaiting approval and seeking funding, Foggia meanwhile sees benefits in more modest tasks. “I use them for changing diapers,” he says. “They’re awesome!”

WILLIAM E. CRAWFORD
 

Comments   

 
Beth Myers
0 #1 Lab DirectorBeth Myers 2011-03-31 13:20:47
Where and when can we purchase these? We work with wastewater testing and could sure use these. These could be advertised at our state lab assn meeting in May. I'm sure these would be a big hit.
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Amber Case
0 #2 Awesome!Amber Case 2011-03-31 16:06:05
I'd love it if there was a version of these that blocked pollution in the air.
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