Sponsored by Energy Trust

The nonprofit project

| Print |  Email
Archives - October 2009
Thursday, October 01, 2009

The annual 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon ranking is almost 17 years old. It’s a unique project in this state, one that not only identifies great places to work, but gives those companies who participate useful, credible information about what their employees think about their workplaces.

But there have never been more than a handful of nonprofits participating. That’s always bothered me because not only are the thousands of nonprofits and not-for-profits providing invaluable services to Oregonians, they also comprise a critical business sector employing many more thousands of people. Nonprofits are the nation’s fourth-largest employer.

We realized nonprofits see themselves as very different from other businesses, but we also believed they had one thing very much in common: caring about their employees. So we decided to develop a groundbreaking workplace best-practices project — a 100 Best project — just for them. We wanted nonprofits to have the insight into their workforce that the corporate world has so readily come to value over the years.

Last year, we enlisted as our partner TACS, a Portland-based nonprofit that also emphasizes best practices in its support and training of nonprofits statewide, to help craft our survey.

We decided early not to restrict the type of nonprofit that could enter. So any organization with more than 10 Oregon employees registered as a nonprofit or not-for-profit in the state was eligible. Those who entered included a wide range of charitable nonprofits that help children, animals, breast cancer victims and many more; business associations; faith-based groups; government entities, and civic organizations.

After that, the project unfolded this spring just like the 100 Best Companies project, with a free anonymous employee survey and an employer benefits survey administered by research partners Davis, Hibbitts and Midghall and our research editor, Brandon Sawyer. As we began to put the word out, we were thrilled to see the enthusiasm for the project.

In the end, we had more than 200 nonprofits qualify and complete the process, a total of 6,700 employees. It’s an impressive launch.

With the debut of the 100 Best Nonprofits, Oregon Business has expanded its 100 Best franchise to three projects. Which brings us full circle to the 100 Best Companies. It’s time to sign up (go to Oregon100Best.com). Entering either the 100 Best Companies or 100 Best Nonprofits survey also qualifies you to be ranked in our 100 Best Green Companies, which we reveal in June.

If you haven’t participated in the 100 Best survey, now’s your chance. The economy may be pummeling your company, but that’s the best time to find out what your employees think, and what you can do to retain your best and brightest.

robin-BLOG
Robin Doussard
Editor
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Twitter.com/robindoussard

MORE ARTICLES:

The list of the 100 Best Non-Profit Companies to Work For in Oregon

Caring mixed with laughter: No. 1 Best Small Nonprofit

Foosball, Focus and Bare Feet: No. 1 Best Medium Nonprofit

A workplace full of hope: No. 1 Best Large Nonprofit

An insider's view on the the Nonprofit Project

A different nonprofit strategy from Small Business columnist, Steve Strauss

How Nonprofits are pulling together to weather the "great recession"

 

More Articles

Corner Office: Steve Tatone

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

Seven tidbits about the president and CEO of AKT Group.


Read more...

Leading with the right brain

News
Tuesday, December 09, 2014
120914-manderson-thumbBY LINDA BAKER

On the eve of the Portland Ad Federation's Rosey Awards, Matt Anderson, CEO of Struck, talks about the transition from creative director to CEO, the Portland talent pool and whether data is the new black in the creative services sector.


Read more...

Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


Read more...

Corner Office: Marv LaPorte

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

The president of LaPorte & Associates lets us in on his day-to-day life.


Read more...

Streetfight

News
Sunday, December 07, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

On Friday, Uber switched on an app — and with one push of the button torpedoed Portland’s famed public process.


Read more...

Shuffling the Deck

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JON BELL

Oregon tribes still bet on casinos.


Read more...

Healthcare Perspective

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

A conversation with Majd El-Azma, president and CEO of LifeWise Health Plan of Oregon, followed by the Healthcare Powerlist.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS