Thank you, Oregon

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Archives - September 2009
Friday, August 21, 2009
When the judges from the American Society of Business Publication Editors named us one of the top three small business publications in the country last month, they said in their comments that Oregon Business was “everything a regional publication should be,” and singled out our “interesting story selections.”

All I can say is, thank you, Oregon. You share in this award because it’s easy to have an interesting magazine when you cover a state like this one.

A prime case in point: this entire issue, starting with the cover story on the innovations at Intel by managing editor Ben Jacklet (page 30). What’s going on with the state’s largest employer (15,300 jobs and counting) is always of interest, but it’s so much more than a giant workforce. It’s recruiting brains from around the globe to help it confront its considerable competition, and investing in Oregon along the way. Intel doesn’t often open its doors to reporters, and our chance to look inside the tech behemoth and bring you that story makes compelling reading.

But you don’t have to be giant to be interesting. Writer Adrianne Jeffries’ profile of T-shirt maker Wicked Quick (page 20) proves that small and quirky can catch fire if you’ve got the right idea. This startup sells cool and has become an investor darling turning away money.

Money is always interesting, and our ranking on page 38 of the top pay of CEOs of public companies is an annual highlight. Research editor Brandon Sawyer spends many hours crunching the public documents, and this year added a new category in the spreadsheet: the stock price. It’s an interesting comparison, to say the least.

Independence is always interesting, and Portland’s music scene is defined by it. How is the PDX music scene redefining the industry? Read our report on page 24.

On the web side, we’re spicing things up with a new weekly blog called On the Scene. Web editor Kevin Manahan is traveling around Portland, reporting on various gatherings and events, sending postcards from the edge of business.

Looking ahead, we’ve calculated the 100 Best Nonprofits to Work For in Oregon and will announce them Sept. 29 at the Portland Art Museum and in the October issue. This project showcases the importance of the nonprofit sector. Go to Oregon100Best.com to register. Come help us honor the amazing work that nonprofits do in Oregon.

It’s great to win awards, but it’s even better to serve our readers and to contribute to the community. Thanks again, Oregon. We couldn’t do it without you.

robin-BLOG
Robin Doussard
Editor
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Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

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