Grazie, all you geeks

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Archives - August 2009
Thursday, July 23, 2009

It's not that I’m cheating on you, or that you don’t have my undivided attention. You do. Really. But I have another mouth to feed, so this isn’t the only column I have to write each month. Far from it. In the Free Range blog area on OregonBusiness.com you’ll find all manner of goings-on that don’t get in our printed magazine.

If you haven’t made a visit to our little Blogville, stroll on over. This past month I wrote about a writing class that I did at Coffee Creek Correctional Institution in Wilsonville, where Mercy Corps has a program teaching women inmates business skills and financial literacy. There’s also the column on the woeful state of the media, with key findings by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism, and the story about the Oregon Garden Resort at the Oregon Garden in Silverton. Want to know how the property is doing after it opened in the midst of the recession? You’ll have to find out by heading to the new website.

Not to mention me coming clean about my tech affair with my Italian boyfriend.

I’ve got good company. Managing editor Ben Jacklet has a blog that’s been keeping tabs on where the jobs are and aren’t. Here’s one snippet: “Oregon’s independent streak and open source software are a natural fit, and there are plenty of smart people out there passionate about putting it to work for the greater good. But for all the hype around open source, real companies creating real jobs have been slow to develop. That may be changing.”

Small business columnist Steve Strauss is pounding out weekly updates on where small business owners can get help, what the new state taxes might mean, and plans for new stimulus programs. If you own a small business, and most of Oregon’s companies are small, he’s a great resource.

Back to that Italian boyfriend. In that blog, I confess my adoration of my stylish, beautiful iPhone (aka Italian), and muse on what makes a device essential, or what makes an application a killer. In this (printed) issue on page 20, writer Adrianne Jeffries profiles Portland’s community of mobile app developers, and the success they’re having creating those killer apps. One of the developers in the story notes that Portland has the potential to be one of the top mobile cities in the country.

Nothing would make me and the Italian happier.

robin-med
Robin Doussard
Editor
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Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

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