Umatilla

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Archives - February 2006
Wednesday, February 01, 2006
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The City of Umatilla is moving closer to a new city hall and library with the purchase of two pieces of property downtown in December and January. The master plan for the new buildings involves a third lot that city officials plan to acquire using eminent domain. Once the property is secured and old buildings are torn down, the new buildings, with 10,000 square feet of space, will be constructed. “We hope to start construction within nine months to a year,” says Larry Clucas, Umatilla city administrator.

 

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