2006 100 Best Companies alphabetical index

| Print |  Email
Archives - March 2006
Wednesday, March 01, 2006

2006 100 Best Companies

Alphabetical index

Large Companies Rank Small Companies Rank
Andersen Construction Co. 44 Adroit Construction Co. 42
Autodesk 12 Arciform LLC 29
Avista Utilities 26 The Bank of Oswego 37
Bank of the Cascades 17 Becker Capital Management 35
Barco Medical Imaging Systems 4 Boly:Welch 38
Bullivant Houser Bailey PC 29 Bridge City Legal 2
Carr Auto Group 5 Capital Pacific Bank 31
Cintas Corporation 14 Cascade Employers Association 34
Columbia River Bank 48 Columbia Community Bank 32
Comcast 20 Combined Communications 36
David Evans and Associates 8 Community First Bank 48
Edelman 24 Conkling Fiskum & McCormick 4
Edge Wireless LLC 3 Contractors Insurance Services 22
Equity Office 6 Convergence Networks 49
First American Title 49 Employment Trends 11
Harland Financial Solutions 45 EthicsPoint 45
Heffernan Insurance Brokers 39 Evanta 16
Henningsen Cold Storage Co. 37 Hutchinson, Cox, Coons, DuPriest et al. 27
HSBC Card Services 23 Independent Actuaries 39
Kaiser Permanente Northwest 32 Jordan Schrader PC 15
Kelly Services 22 KPD Insurance 14
KeyBank, Oregon/SW Washington District 40 Madden Industrial Craftsmen 23
Lime Financial Services Ltd. 35 Neurology Assoc. of Eugene-Springfield PC 7
Nike 28 Northwest Community Credit Union 17
Oregon Community Credit Union 18 Northwest Newborn Specialists PC 3
Oregon Medical Laboratories 30 NW Portland Area Indian Health Board 40
The Paradies Shops 25 Northwest Staffing Resources 28
Parametrix 43 On-Site Financial 50
Perkins Coie LLP 42 opus:creative 47
The Personnel Department 2 Oregon Telecom 33
Portland Impact 50 Pacific Benefit Consultants 13
PremierWest Bank 47 Pacific Continental Bank 41
Providence Health System — Oregon 41 Palo Alto Software 25
R&H Construction 27 The Partners Group Ltd. 20
The Randall Group 16 Performance Health Technology 8
Ron Tonkin Family of Dealerships 13 Pittman & Brooks PC 9
Schwabe, Williamson & Wyatt 15 Point B Solutions Group LLP 46
Sprint LCS / Medford Solutions Center 11 Pop Art 24
The Stoller Group 46 PREM Group 12
Stimson Lumber Company 34 Reitmeier Mechanical 10
Symantec Corporation 33 Sparling 44
SYSCO Food Services of Portland 36 Staff Finders Technical of Oregon 6
T-Mobile USA 10 Sussman Shank LLP 43
U.S. Cellular 1 Tec Laboratories 19
Umpqua Bank 9 United Human Capital Solutions 5
Walsh Construction Co. 7 Vernier Software & Technology 30
Wells Fargo Bank 31 VTM 21
West Coast Bancorp 21 Weston Dealerships 1
Wieden+Kennedy 38 Willamette Valley Bank 18
WRG Design 19 Windermere/Realty Partners 26

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Links:

 

 

More Articles

Streetfight

News
Sunday, December 07, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

On Friday, Uber switched on an app — and with one push of the button torpedoed Portland’s famed public process.


Read more...

Tackling the CEO-worker pay gap

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014
BY OREGON BUSINESS STAFF

An SEC rule targets the disparity between executive and employee compensation, reigniting a long-standing debate about corporate social responsibility.


Read more...

Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


Read more...

See How They Run

January-Powerbook 2015
Friday, December 12, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Studying ground-running birds, a group that ranks among nature's speediest and most agile bipedal runners, to build a faster robot.


Read more...

Old school: Paulsen's Pharmacy maintains old fashion ethos

The Latest
Thursday, December 18, 2014
121914-pharmacy-thumbBY MEGHAN NOLT

VIDEO: Under the radar — complete with a soda counter, the traditional Paulsen's Pharmacy looks to compete with big box retailers.


Read more...

OB Poll: Wineries and groceries

News
Friday, October 24, 2014

24-winethumbA majority of respondents agreed: Local vineyards should remain Oregon-owned and quality is the most important factor when determining where to eat or buy groceries.


Read more...

Free Falling

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, December 18, 2014
121714-oilprice-thumbBY JASON NORRIS | OB CONTRIBUTOR

The implosion of the energy complex: The best thing for low oil prices is low oil prices.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS