Astoria

| Print |  Email
Archives - April 2006
Saturday, April 01, 2006

{safe_alt_text}

The Port of Astoria has announced an $11 million financing commitment from the Oregon Economic and Community Development Department for the Bornstein Seafoods fish processing plant, which was completed in March at Pier 2. Last year, Bornstein Seafoods decided to relocate its Astoria waterfront plant to a new 34,000-square-foot facility at the port’s central waterfront district. “The port’s construction of the Bornstein’s facility represents an essential element in the economic health of the seafood industry, and therefore the economic health of Astoria,” says Peter Gearin, the port’s executive director. Gearin says the new plant ensures the 100 current Bornstein jobs will remain in the community.

 

More Articles

A Taste of Heaven

September 2014
Tuesday, August 26, 2014
BY VIVIAN MCINERNY

Craft beer comes to Mount Angel.


Read more...

Podcast: Interview with Steve Balzac

Contributed Blogs
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

082014BalzacBY TOM COX | OB BLOGGER

Tom Cox interviews Steve Balzac, author of "Organizational Psychology for Managers."


Read more...

Tight and Loose

September 2014
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
BY JENNIFER MARGULIS

As schools implement more rigorous academic standards, holistic and flexible approaches to K-12 education flourish.


Read more...

College Hacker

September 2014
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
BY KLINT FINLEY

Treehouse CEO Ryan Carson builds a 21st-century trade school.


Read more...

Downtime

September 2014
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
BY JESSICA RIDGWAY

How State Representative Julie Parrish (House District 37) balances life between work and play.


Read more...

Startup or Grow Up?

September 2014
Tuesday, August 26, 2014
BY JON BELL

Startup culture is all the rage. Is there a downside?


Read more...

Is this employee right?

Contributed Blogs
Wednesday, August 13, 2014
081314 thumb employeefeelingsBY TOM COX | OB BLOGGER

When I say, “Your Employee is Always Right,” I do not mean “right about the facts,” but rather “right about how they feel” and “right about how they want to be led.”


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS