May 2006
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1 David Chen of OVP Venture Partners: Catalyst at work
2 02/06 employment and business filing indicators
3 02/06 transportation indicators
4 02/06 real estate and construction indicators
5 02/06 farming, natural resources and energy indicators
6 More pre-K education makes good sense for business
7 Good news for the little guy
8 A bumper-sticker campaign for education
9 It's time to end Oregon’s "corporate tax dodge"
10 First person: Commentary from an Eastern Oregon farmer
11 Readers rate sources of information
12 Science: Young inventors seek to save the world
13 Taxes: a lighter burden than most states
14 Going back in time to build a business
15 Shipping: East meets East in Umatilla
16 How to foster an ethical workplace
17 Workers’ comp law: Insurance not a legal shield
18 Charitable giving: Uncovering hidden benefits
19 Statewide
20 Arlington
21 Portland
22 Portland
23 Hillsboro
24 Silverton
25 Noti
26 Grants Pass
27 Central Point
28 Ashland
29 The Coast
30 Tillamook
31 Eugene
32 Hillsboro
33 Redmond
34 Printing jobs in decline nationwide and in Oregon
35 Oregon air passenger traffic rises
36 Portland Business Alliance's 2005 Top 10 Growth Companies
37 Central Oregon's construction boom draws skilled labor away from manufacturers
38 VIP: Conversation with Cindy McEntee, CEO of Mo's restaurants on the Oregon Coast
39 Lawsuit against Blackberry highlights intellectual property risks
 

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The short list: 5 hot coffee shops for entrepreneurs

Contributed Blogs
Friday, November 14, 2014

CupojoeBY JESSICA RIDGWAY

Oregon entrepreneurs reveal their favorite caffeine hangouts.


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Streetfight

News
Sunday, December 07, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

On Friday, Uber switched on an app — and with one push of the button torpedoed Portland’s famed public process.


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Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


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Tackling the CEO-worker pay gap

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014
BY OREGON BUSINESS STAFF

An SEC rule targets the disparity between executive and employee compensation, reigniting a long-standing debate about corporate social responsibility.


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Downtime

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JESSICA RIDGWAY

Bob Dethlefs, CEO of Evanta, balances work and play.


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The short list: 4 companies engaged in a battle of the paddles

The Latest
Thursday, December 04, 2014
pingpongthumbBY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Nothing says startup culture like a ping pong table in the office, lounge or lobby.


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Water World

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

Fred Ziari aims to feed the global population.


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