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2006 Private 150: alphabetical index and footnotes

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Archives - July 2006
Saturday, July 01, 2006
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Index

Company                                            Rank
A-Dec 38 G.I. Joe’s 42 Portland Food Products Co. 99
All About Travel 85 Guaranty Chevrolet Pontiac Oldsmobile 30 Powell’s Books 130
Allegro Corporation 141 Halton Co. 63 R&H Construction Co. 101
Allied Systems Co. 131 Hampton Affiliates 2 R.B. Pamplin Corp. and Subs. 16
Alpenrose Dairy 128 Hanna Andersson Corp. 94 Reser’s Fine Foods 17
Andersen Construction Co. 47 Harder Mechanical Contractors 68 Rexius Forest By-Products 147
Anthro Corp. 149 Harsch Investment Properties 47 Rogers Machinery Company 132
Associated Business Systems 148 Hoffman Corp. 10 Ron Tonkin Dealerships 18
Avamere Health Services 56 HUNTAIR 122 Roseburg Forest Products 6
Azumano Travel 51 Independent Dispatch 120 Roth’s IGA Foodliner 81
Beall Corp. 69 Integra Telecom 61 S.D. Deacon Corp. 32
Bi-Mart Corp. 14 Jeld-Wen 1 Schwabe Williamson & Wyatt PC 126
Blue Heron Paper Company 47 John Hyland Construction Co. 121 Shari’s Management Corp. 62
Bright Wood Corp. 36 Jubitz Corp. 107 Shelter Products 66
Buena Vista Custom Homes 76 Keith Brown Building Materials 113 Sherm’s Thunderbird Market 59
Bullivant Houser Bailey PC 114 Kerr Pacific Corp. 67 Shilo Inns 100
Butler Automotive Group 109 Landmark Ford 83 Slayden Construction 88
C&K Market 26 Lanphere Enterprises 23 Smith Frozen Foods 124
Caffall Bros. Forest Products 125 LCG Pence Construction LLC 129 SnapNames.com 145
Capitol Auto Group 50 Leatherman Tool Group 102 South Coast Lumber Co. 74
Carr Auto Group 54 Legend Homes/Matrix Dev. Corp. 45 States Industries 79
Carson Oil Co. 35 Les Schwab Tire Centers 4 Stoel Rives LLP 58
Cascade General 116 Leupold & Stevens 65 Sunset Imports 123
Cascade Wood Products 57 Lime Financial Services 103 TEC Equipment 44
Chambers Construction Co. 135 Lumber Products 24 The Portland Clinic 142
Collins Companies 41 M Financial Group 12 The Swanson Group 22
Colson & Colson/Holiday Retirement Corp. 7 Marathon Coach 91 Timber Products Co. 20
Columbia Distributing Co. 19 Market Transport Services 28 Touchmark 95
Columbia Forest Products 8 May Trucking Co. 64 Triplett Wellman 144
Columbia Helicopters 75 McDonald Candy Co. 72 Tripwire 143
Combined Transport 108 Micro Power Electronics 136 Tumac Lumber Co. 31
Compview 146 Miller Nash LLP 133 Turf Merchants 138
Consolidated Supply Co. 60 Morrow Equipment Co. 72 Tyree Oil 96
Contact Lumber Co. 98 Mt. Hood Beverage Co. 42 Unicru 138
Coos Bay Lumber Co. LLC 112 North Pacific 4 United Pipe & Supply Co. 55
Cummings Oil Co. 33 North Pacific Management 127 Vesta Corporation 13
D.R. Johnson Lumber Co. 52 Northwest Pump & Equipment Co. 106 Walsh Construction Co. 40
David Evans and Associates 79 Ochoco Lumber Co. 70 West Hills Development Co. 46
Deschutes Brewery 150 Oregon Canadian Forest Products 105 Western Family Foods 15
Don Rasmussen Co. 37 OrePac Building Products 25 Western Tool Supply 90
DSU Peterbilt and GMC 84 OSF International 93 Weston Pontiac-Buick-GMC 110
Emerick Construction Co. 133 P&C Construction Co. 140 Widmer Brothers Brewing Co. 117
Encore Senior Living LLC 118 PACCESS 29 Wieden+Kennedy 88
ENTEK Holding LLC 71 Pacific Coast Restaurants 97 Willamette Dental Management Corp. 82
EPIC Aviation LLC 3 Pacific Seafood Group 9 Willamette Valley Co. 87
Evergreen International Aviation 11 Parr Lumber Co. 21 Withnell Motor Co. 119
Farwest Fibers 137 Perlo McCormack Pacific 115 Wrights Foodliner 86
Farwest Steel Corp. 34 Peterson Pacific Corp. 111 WSCO Petroleum Corp. 39
Freres Lumber Co. 77 Plaid Pantries 78 Yoshida Group 53
Frontier Resources LLC 91 Platt Electric Supply 27 Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Partnership 104

Go to ranks 1-50...

Go to ranks 51-100...

Go to ranks 101-150...

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Footnotes

Grant Thornton is research adviser and sponsor of Oregon Business' Private 150 list.

Companies are ranked based on revenue from most recent fiscal year as reported to Oregon Business by a company representative. Companies must be privately held and headquartered in Oregon.  Companies sharing the same rank have the same reported revenues.


Correction:
In the print version of the July issue of Oregon Business, Lumber Products was incorrectly ranked no. 28. The company should have been ranked no. 24 as it is in this Web version of the list. As a result companies ranked 24-27 in the printed version have all moved down one rank.

NR: Not ranked in 2005. 
WND: Will not disclose. 
Empty fields reflect information not received.

*Acquired by publicly traded UTi Worldwide in March 2006.  Formerly known as Market Transport Ltd.   
**60% owned by New York-based KPS Special Situations Fund LP, a New York private equity fund; 35% owned by employees; 5% owned by senior executives.
***Does not release annual revenue data. 2005 revenue was estimated by Advertising Age in list of top independent agencies, published April 28, 2006.
†Purchased in April 2006 by CES, a division of Nortek, based in Providence R.I.

It is likely that the following companies would have ranked among the Private 150; however, they did not respond to the survey or chose not to release revenue information for their last fiscal year: Boyd Coffee Company, Brooks Resources Corp., Chambers Communications Corp., Courtesy Ford, Crater Lake Motors, Emerald Forest Products, ESCO Corp., Harry & David Holdings, Kendall Automotive Group, Kettle Foods, Knowledge Learning Corp., McMenamin’s Pubs & Breweries, Pendleton Woolen Mills, Robinson Construction, Seneca Sawmill Co., Stimson Lumber Co.,  Willamette Auto Group, Vanport Group, Wildish Land Co. and Zenitram/Town & Country Dealerships.

Please contact Brandon Sawyer at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or 503.223.0304 regarding corrections or comments about the Private 150.

To participate in the list next year, go to www.oregonbusiness.com/Private150/.

 

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