Sponsored by Oregon Business

Business readers vote to fund schools with kicker

| Print |  Email
Archives - August 2006
Tuesday, August 01, 2006

Our Input respondents are nothing if not an independent bunch. The 718 participants in this month’s survey, conducted by Conkling Fiskum & McCormick, are mostly CEOs and business owners. So at first it might be surprising that the majority votes to eliminate the corporate kicker, use the money for K-12 education, put any surplus revenue in a rainy-day fund and create a sales tax. But Patrick Fleenor, the chief economist for the nonprofit, nonpartisan Tax Foundation based in Washington, D.C., says it makes sense. “Businesses are concerned with their taxes relative to their competitors,” he says. “When you ask businesspeople tax questions, first thing they will ask is how it will affect their bottom line.” Businesses understand the value of a strong K-12 education system to their ability to recruit employees and hire a skilled workforce. They feel at a competitive disadvantage with the current quality of K-12 education, so much so they are willing to take a tax refund out of their own pocket to do it. And that perennial hot potato, the sales tax? Fleenor says that even with the strong support of some of the business community (memo to those independent Input respondents), “It’s almost impossible to change any tax structure.” 

View slideshow
{safe_alt_text}

To participate in the Input survey, send an e-mail to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Research conducted by Conkling Fiskum & McCormick.

 

More Articles

Uncertainty about convention center hotel could cost Portland an NBA All-Star Game

The Latest
Wednesday, February 18, 2015
463545460BY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

NBA commissioner: "I would love to end up having an All-Star Game in Portland. It's really just a function of ensuring that we can fit in town."


Read more...

Beyond Bodegas

April 2015
Friday, March 27, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Five years in the making, the Portland Mercado — the city’s first Latino public market — will celebrate its grand opening April 11. A $3.5 million public-private partnership spearheaded by Hacienda CDC, the market will house 15 to 20 businesses in the food, retail and service sectors. It has some big-name funders, including the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation and JPMorgan Chase. The project goals are equally ambitious: to improve cross-cultural understanding, alleviate poverty and spur community economic development. 


Read more...

100 Best: The Power of the Worker

March 2015
Wednesday, February 25, 2015
BY KIM MOORE | OB RESEARCH EDITOR
AND AMY MILSHTEIN | OB CONTRIBUTOR

Technology is empowering people like never before and transforming how employees interact in the workplace. How can companies attract and keep staff engaged in this rapidly changing world?


Read more...

Thy neighbor's house

March 2015
Friday, February 20, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

Vacasa may lack the name recognition of Airbnb. But not for long.


Read more...

Meeting Facilities Perspective

March 2015
Tuesday, February 24, 2015
BY KIM MOORE | OB RESEARCH EDITOR

A conversation with Donna Earley, director of sales and marketing for the Salem Convention Center.


Read more...

5 schools helping students crack code

The Latest
Thursday, January 29, 2015
codeduthumbnailBY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

As the costs of college mount, and as employer demand for software developers soars, coding schools and classes are popping up everywhere.


Read more...

Courtside

April 2015
Thursday, March 26, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Enjoying a power lunch at Court Street Dairy Lunch in Salem.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS