December 2006
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# Article Title
1 The 2006 Oregon Philanthropy Awards
2 Vollum Award for Lifetime Philanthropic Achievement: Ken and Joan Austin
3 Portland's core problem
4 Don’t be so easy on yourself
5 In Character: Profile of Dan Heims, owner of Terra Nova Nurseries
6 First Person: Commentary by Laura Fitzpatrick, lingerie entrepreneur
7 VIP: Conversation with George Puentes, CEO of Don Pancho Authentic Mexican Food
8 Just half of readers contribute to charities
9 More of the Celilo story
10 Look closer at the Budweiser ads
11 No protection from the laws of economics
12 Marketing: Star in your own postage stamp
13 Dufur
14 Arlington
15 La Grande
16 Chemult
17 Klamath Falls
18 Vancouver
19 Gresham
20 Portland
21 Lake Oswego
22 Corvallis
23 Eugene
24 Central Point
25 St. Helens
26 Tillamook
27 A logging town reinvents itself
28 Oregon Christmas trees fetch premium prices
29 Energy on the edge: Reducing waste at home
30 September '06 transportation indicators
31 September '06 employment and business filing indicators
32 September '06 farming, natural resources and energy indicators
33 September '06 real estate and construction indicators
34 Employment Dept.: Most Oregon products remain in the Northwest
35 Power and gas hold steady
36 Gold-n-Soft margarine celebrates 40 years
37 Pendleton mines the past to build a future
38 Dagoba Chocolate sells to Hershey
39 Hazelnut blight fight
 

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See How They Run

January-Powerbook 2015
Friday, December 12, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Studying ground-running birds, a group that ranks among nature's speediest and most agile bipedal runners, to build a faster robot.


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Streetfight

News
Sunday, December 07, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

On Friday, Uber switched on an app — and with one push of the button torpedoed Portland’s famed public process.


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Dan and Louis Oyster Bar opens up to a changing neighborhood

The Latest
Thursday, December 11, 2014
121114-oystervidBy MEGHAN NOLT

VIDEO: Revamping a Classic — an iconic eatery stays relevant in a changing marketplace.


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Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


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The short list: 5 companies making a mint off kale

The Latest
Thursday, November 20, 2014
kale-thumbnailBY OB STAFF

Farmers, grocery stores and food processors cash in on kale.


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Tackling the CEO-worker pay gap

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014
BY OREGON BUSINESS STAFF

An SEC rule targets the disparity between executive and employee compensation, reigniting a long-standing debate about corporate social responsibility.


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Top stories in 2014

The Latest
Thursday, December 18, 2014
10-listthumb

2014 was a year of wild contradictions, fast-paced growth and unexpected revelations.


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