Sponsored by Oregon Business

Taking Yamhill County history into the future

| Print |  Email
Archives - January 2007
Monday, January 01, 2007
Springbrook0107.jpg Springbrook once boasted a cannery and busy train depot.


NEWBERG — Before there was a Newberg, there was a Springbrook, an agricultural hamlet with a hotel, a school, a church and a cannery.

Over the next few years, Springbrook will rise again, under the watchful eye of philanthropist and entrepreneur Joan Austin.

At the end of November, Austin announced her intention to develop 433 acres with a mixed-use community including a luxury inn, spa, restaurant, retail village, parks and a collection of homes.

Austin, executive vice president of Newberg dental equipment manufacturer A-dec, says she hopes the inn will open sometime in 2009. “We’ll have to move along to get that to happen.”

The plan is getting love from winemakers who applaud the fact that the development will happen on land inside the urban growth boundary and won’t compete with the vineyards.

“It’s a really cool project because it meets the requirements of so many stakeholders,” says Mary Arnstad, a consultant working with Austin.

Arnstad, who has held management positions at Portland’s Heathman Hotel, Bend’s Broken Top, the Ashland Springs Hotel and the Salishan Lodge in Gleneden Beach, says it’s an honor to be working on the Springbrook project. “I feel like I’m back with John and Betty Gray at Salishan,” she says, referring to the hotel’s original developers.

Austin says she entertained offers from other developers to buy the land, but she wanted to keep control of how Springbrook would look and feel — and that includes preserving the old schoolhouse and making sure the agricultural past is remembered.

— Christina Williams

Have an opinion? E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

More Articles

Oregon Business expands events portfolio

The Latest
Friday, March 27, 2015
htctfacebookBY OB STAFF

New events series brings magazine to life.


Read more...

Beam Me Up

April 2015
Thursday, March 19, 2015
BY DAN COOK | Photos by Jason E. Kaplan

An alliance of developers, academics and timber industry executives wants to position Oregon as a front runner in the glamorous new world of wooden skyscrapers.


Read more...

Nuclear fingerprints

March 2015
Tuesday, February 24, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

At Oregon State University, a 21st century version of the bad dream — nuclear terrorism — is alive and well. This winter, the Department of Nuclear Physics and Radiation Health Physics created a new interdisciplinary graduate emphasis in nuclear forensics, a Sherlock Holmes-sounding program that aims to identify how and where confiscated nuclear and radiological materials were created.


Read more...

Party Like It’s 1999

Contributed Blogs
Wednesday, February 25, 2015
pets-com-sock-puppetBY JASON NORRIS, CFA | OB GUEST BLOGGER

Pets.com, GeoCities, eToys, and WorldCom … blasts-from-the-past that all signify the late 1990s Internet bubble. Yet we believe the dynamics of the market, specifically in technology stocks, are much different today than it was during the late 1990s.


Read more...

Get on the bus!

April 2015
Thursday, March 19, 2015
BY APRIL STREETER

How the private sector can ride the next transit revolution.


Read more...

5 questions for inDinero CEO Jessica Mah

The Latest
Tuesday, March 31, 2015
jessicathumbBY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

inDinero, a business that manages back-office accounting for startups and smaller companies, recently announced it would relocate its headquarters from San Francisco to Portland. We talked to CEO Jessica Mah about what drew her to Portland and how she plans to disrupt the traditional CPA model.


Read more...

Beyond Bodegas

April 2015
Friday, March 27, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Five years in the making, the Portland Mercado — the city’s first Latino public market — will celebrate its grand opening April 11. A $3.5 million public-private partnership spearheaded by Hacienda CDC, the market will house 15 to 20 businesses in the food, retail and service sectors. It has some big-name funders, including the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation and JPMorgan Chase. The project goals are equally ambitious: to improve cross-cultural understanding, alleviate poverty and spur community economic development. 


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS