Taking Yamhill County history into the future

| Print |  Email
Archives - January 2007
Monday, January 01, 2007
Springbrook0107.jpg Springbrook once boasted a cannery and busy train depot.


NEWBERG — Before there was a Newberg, there was a Springbrook, an agricultural hamlet with a hotel, a school, a church and a cannery.

Over the next few years, Springbrook will rise again, under the watchful eye of philanthropist and entrepreneur Joan Austin.

At the end of November, Austin announced her intention to develop 433 acres with a mixed-use community including a luxury inn, spa, restaurant, retail village, parks and a collection of homes.

Austin, executive vice president of Newberg dental equipment manufacturer A-dec, says she hopes the inn will open sometime in 2009. “We’ll have to move along to get that to happen.”

The plan is getting love from winemakers who applaud the fact that the development will happen on land inside the urban growth boundary and won’t compete with the vineyards.

“It’s a really cool project because it meets the requirements of so many stakeholders,” says Mary Arnstad, a consultant working with Austin.

Arnstad, who has held management positions at Portland’s Heathman Hotel, Bend’s Broken Top, the Ashland Springs Hotel and the Salishan Lodge in Gleneden Beach, says it’s an honor to be working on the Springbrook project. “I feel like I’m back with John and Betty Gray at Salishan,” she says, referring to the hotel’s original developers.

Austin says she entertained offers from other developers to buy the land, but she wanted to keep control of how Springbrook would look and feel — and that includes preserving the old schoolhouse and making sure the agricultural past is remembered.

— Christina Williams

Have an opinion? E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

More Articles

Is there life beyond Reed?

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
BY GARY THILL | PHOTOS BY JASON E. KAPLAN

A storied institution climbs down from the ivory tower.


Read more...

Bendafornia: What’s driving the Northern California migration?

Contributed Blogs
Wednesday, August 05, 2015
bendiforniathumbBY KEN MAES

A huge migration from Northern California has contributed to average 16% growth per year since 1990.


Read more...

5 things to know about veterans in the workforce

The Latest
Wednesday, July 01, 2015
070215-vetsthumbBY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

There are more than 10 million former military members working in the United States.


Read more...

Downtime with Debra Ringold

July/August 2015
Monday, July 13, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Dean of the Atkinson Graduate School of Management, Willamette University


Read more...

Department of Self-Promotion

Linda Baker
Tuesday, August 04, 2015

061715-awards1Oregon Business wins journalism awards.


Read more...

Back to School

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
BY CHRIS NOBLE

Oregon is home to an abundance of gritty warehouses reborn as trendy office spaces, as well as crafty hipsters turned entrepreneurs. Does the combination yield an equally bounteous office products sector? Not so much. Occupying the limited desk jockey space are Field Notes, a spinoff of Portland’s Draplin Design Company, and Schuttenworks, known for whittling Apple device stands. For a full complement of keyboard trays, docking stations and mouse pads, check out the GroveMade line, guaranteed to boost the cachet of even the lowliest cubicle drone. 


Read more...

Light Reading

September 2015
Thursday, August 20, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Ask any college student: Textbook prices have skyrocketed out of control. Online education startup Lumen Learning aims to bring them down to earth.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS