Sponsored by Energy Trust

RICHLAND, WASH

| Print |  Email
Archives - February 2007
Thursday, February 01, 2007

Map.Richland.gif

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory solidified a deal with Apollo Sensor Technology and scientists at Russia’s Karpov Institute of Physical Chemistry in Moscow to market a hydrogen gas sensor. Russian scientists developed a new approach, using nanoscale materials in the sensor, designed to detect hydrogen leaks. According to Geoffrey Harvey from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the new sensor fits in the palm of a hand, detects the smallest of leaks and has an almost immediate response time. “A sensor that does all that ours does is up in the $1,500-$3,000 range,” says Dan Briscoe, vice president of Kennewick, Wash.-based Apollo Sensor Technology. This sensor will be marketed for around $200. It is intended for use in chemical processing plants and refineries, motor vehicles and in hydrogen fuel cells used as backup power generators.

 

Have an opinion? E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

More Articles

Corner Office: Timothy Mitchell

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

A look-in on the life of Norris & Stevens' president.


Read more...

Corner Office: Sheree Arntson

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

Checking in with the managing director of Arnerich Massena.


Read more...

OB Poll: Wineries and groceries

News
Friday, October 24, 2014

24-winethumbA majority of respondents agreed: Local vineyards should remain Oregon-owned and quality is the most important factor when determining where to eat or buy groceries.


Read more...

Healthcare Perspective

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

A conversation with Majd El-Azma, president and CEO of LifeWise Health Plan of Oregon, followed by the Healthcare Powerlist.


Read more...

Growing a mobility cluster

News
Friday, October 31, 2014
0414 bikes bd2f6052BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

Why are there so few transportation startups in Portland?  The city’s leadership in bike, transit and pedestrian transportation has been well-documented.  But that was then — when government and nonprofits paved the way for a new, less auto centric way of life.


Read more...

Legislative Preview: A Shifting Balance

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014
BY APRIL STREETER

Democratic gains pave the way for a revival of environment and labor bills as revenue reform languishes.


Read more...

Shuffling the Deck

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JON BELL

Oregon tribes still bet on casinos.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS