Frozen organic baby food brand launched in Portland

| Print |  Email
Archives - February 2007
Thursday, February 01, 2007

NiceCubesBabyFood.jpgPORTLAND — Gerber baby, eat your strained-carrot heart out. The latest health food wave has reached the youngest Oregon consumers with the introduction of Nice Cubes, a new brand of frozen organic baby food, the first of its kind developed locally.

Nice Cubes is part of the booming nationwide organic baby food market. According to marketing research firm A.C. Nielsen Co., this segment of the organic food market grew 18% between 2004 and 2005, bringing in $100 million in 2005.

“Our approach is to create a product that’s as fresh as homemade,” says company founder and Portland mom Katie McNamara, who began work on her product a year ago after winning the American Food Fight competition put on by Oregon State University’s Food Innovation Center. Each four-ounce Nice Cubes serving, packaged in a square tray, contain grains, fruits and vegetables grown locally. Trays are stacked three high to form cubes and are sold at New Seasons and Whole Foods as well as at the Food Front market co-op.

Besides introducing tots to such flavors as “bandango” and “gentle lentils,” Nice Cubes purees are jam-packed with vitamins, according to McNamara. She explains that since the cubes are frozen, they lack the added preservatives necessary for shelf food.

“We’re supplying moms with the fresh food they want for their babies,” she says. At $4.95 a box, Nice Cubes is aimed at the moms who can afford to be discriminating.

But to McNamara, the growing legions of the stroller set in that demographic are enough to build a business on. Now she just hopes those babies will give Nice Cubes two spoons up.

— Colleen Moran


Have an opinion? E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

More Articles

Picture This

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

As a general rule, the more people with autism can be provided with visual cues, the better they will be able to understand and manage their environment. It’s a lesson Tom Keating learned well. The 61-year-old Eugene grant writer spent 31 years taking care of his autistic brother James, and in the late 1980s developed a spreadsheet that created a series of nonsense characters that grew or shrank depending on how much money James had in his account. 


Read more...

Man for All Seasons

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

A longtime technologist and entrepreneur, Dwayne Johnson, 53, is managing partner of PDXO/GlobeThree Ventures, a strategy and business consultancy in Portland.


Read more...

The best crisis is the one you avoid

Contributed Blogs
Wednesday, April 15, 2015
crisisthumbBY GARY CONKLING | GUEST BLOGGER

Avoiding a crisis is a great way to burnish your reputation, increase brand loyalty and become a market leader.


Read more...

100 Best Green Workplaces in Oregon

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY KIM MOORE

As momentum grows at the state level to introduce far-reaching environmental regulations, such as carbon pricing and the Clean Fuels Program, Oregon employers continue to go the extra mile to create green workplaces for their employees.


Read more...

5 questions for Flywheel CEO Rakesh Mathur

The Latest
Wednesday, April 29, 2015
FW splashBY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Portland is awash in rideshare options. We ask the head of Flywheel what sets his app apart.


Read more...

The Green Paradox

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY EMILY LIEDEL

Inside the topsy-turvy world of corporate sustainability rankings.


Read more...

Can small be large?

Linda Baker
Wednesday, April 01, 2015
040115-lindablogthumbBY LINDA BAKER

Leaders in Oregon's ag sector gathered this morning in Portland’s Coopers Hall winery/taproom to discuss the role of the region as an export gateway, impediments to exporting products and solutions to containerized shipping challenges.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS