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Archives - March 2007
Thursday, March 01, 2007

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Great ideas don’t always lend themselves to a good market presence. A new course at Oregon State University’s College of Business should help bridge that gap. A course in technology commercialization, or the process of bringing technical innovation to the marketplace, began in February. The course focuses on assessing the business viability of a technical idea as well as how to develop a good approach for commercialization.


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