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100 Best methodology

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Archives - March 2007
Thursday, March 01, 2007
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100 Best methodology


Employee survey

Company participation in the 100 Best survey is voluntary and free of charge. Participating companies must employ at least 15 Oregon workers. Companies are categorized as small if they employ less than 250 people; large companies are those with 250 or more employees. This year, nearly 31,000 employees (about 1.7% of those employed in Oregon) rated their satisfaction with 342 employers in 50 workplace qualities — 10 in each of the following categories.

  1. Benefits and compensation: health coverage, fitness program, retirement plan, salary and bonuses, employee retention

  2. Work environment: scheduling, diversity, family balance, teamwork, fun, technology, charity/community work, policies and procedures

  3. Decision-making and trust: collaboration, trust and openness, cooperation across divisions, organizational pride, ethical standards

  4. Performance management: performance feedback and goals, employee accountability, rewards and incentives

  5. Career development and learning: opportunities, promotions, employee training, educational support, company communications

Employer benefits survey

Company representatives answered 45 questions covering a comprehensive set of benefits including health and wellness plans, time off, family-friendly policies, work scheduling, incentives, retirement plans and corporate culture.

Scoring

The employee survey counts for 5/6 of a participating company’s score. For each company, the average employee rating is calculated in each of the five categories on a scale of 0-100. The benefits survey is also scored on a 100-point scale, accounting for the remaining 1/6 of the overall score.



THE LIST

The top 50 large companies to work for in Oregon

The top 50 small companies to work for in Oregon

THE INDEX

Alphabetical index

Category winners (Top 10s)

Methodology



WINNING PROFILES

No. 1 large: U.S. Cellular leads the pack — again...

No. 1 small: River City Travel, freedom isn't just a concept...

No. 6 large: Evanta gives employees "everything"...

No. 2 small: Columbia Printing nurtures a growing family...

No. 7 large: Walsh builds success on shared values...

No. 10 small: Quango, a place for hard work — ­­and naps...



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