Readers more optimisitic about economy

| Print |  Email
Archives - April 2007
Sunday, April 01, 2007

What industry will be the top employers in Oregon in 10 years?

AUG-04 JAN-07 CHANGE
Health care 60% 69% +9
Recreation/tourism 51% 57% +6
High technology/software 45% 48% +3
High technology/hardware 45% 41% -4
Professional services 33% 35% +2
Food processing and agriculture 24% 33% +11
Education and social services 32% 31% -1
Nursery products 20% 25% +5
Biomedical 35% 24% -11
Apparel and sporting goods 29% 21% -8
Forest products/wood/paper 20% 19% -1
Financial services 17% 19% +2
Creative services 13% 15% +2
Transportation equipment 8% 4% -4
Metals 3% 4% +1

Let’s not call it irrational exuberance, but there is a definite optimism being felt by the 913 respondents in our three-part Input survey about the state of the economy, business health and personal financial stability.

This month, the survey, conducted by research partner Conkling Fiskum & McCormick, explores our readers’ take on the economy’s strengths and weaknesses. In May, we ask how their own businesses are doing; in June, we get insight into their personal financial situation.

“The big surprise to me is that there aren’t any big surprises,” says Jay Clemens, president of Associated Oregon Industries, the state’s largest business association, about the survey’s results. “Business is pretty good right now.”

What also is unsurprising to Clemens is that the overwhelming concern of this group is unfavorable government regulations. Oregon is a strong manufacturing state, and those industries are heavily influenced by the regulatory environment, he notes.

So while the economy might be good now, “it works in cycles,” reminds Clemens. The AOI constituency is “concerned about over the long term being able to continue to provide the kind of economy that makes people feel good about their quality of life.”

What’s most important from his vantage point? Keeping the regulatory environment competitive and having a good labor pool.

“Regulations add on costs,” says Clemens, “It’s a huge concern for us in making Oregon competitive in attracting new businesses and keeping businesses. Oregon isn’t an island.”

View slideshow

0407Input1.gif

To participate in the Input survey, send an e-mail to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Research conducted by Conkling Fiskum & McCormick.

 

 

More Articles

Uncertainty about convention center hotel could cost Portland an NBA All-Star Game

The Latest
Wednesday, February 18, 2015
463545460BY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

NBA commissioner: "I would love to end up having an All-Star Game in Portland. It's really just a function of ensuring that we can fit in town."


Read more...

Raising the Stakes

February 2015
Monday, January 26, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

The 2014 Bend Venture Conference set a record for the most cash, investments and prizes awarded at an angel conference in the Pacific Northwest. Investments in the six winning companies exceeded $1 million. The 11th annual conference was hosted by Economic Development of Central Oregon.


Read more...

Labor Pains

February 2015
Monday, January 26, 2015
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

Thinking about starting an internship program? Be careful. Navigating unpaid internships can be tricky.


Read more...

Convention Wisdom

February 2015
Monday, January 26, 2015
BY KIM MOORE

After more than a decade of wrangling, construction on a convention center hotel in Portland is slated to start this summer. But debate over project financing continues.


Read more...

Closing the Gap: The two Oregons and the way forward

February 2015
Monday, January 26, 2015
BY JOE CORTRIGHT

"Nostalgia is not an economic strategy."


Read more...

5 schools helping students crack code

The Latest
Thursday, January 29, 2015
codeduthumbnailBY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

As the costs of college mount, and as employer demand for software developers soars, coding schools and classes are popping up everywhere.


Read more...

Nuclear fingerprints

March 2015
Tuesday, February 24, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

At Oregon State University, a 21st century version of the bad dream — nuclear terrorism — is alive and well. This winter, the Department of Nuclear Physics and Radiation Health Physics created a new interdisciplinary graduate emphasis in nuclear forensics, a Sherlock Holmes-sounding program that aims to identify how and where confiscated nuclear and radiological materials were created.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS