Sponsored by Oregon Business

Labor union representation ebbs

| Print |  Email
Archives - May 2007
Tuesday, May 01, 2007

In most occupations, the nation’s union-represented workers earn more than those who are not represented. However, union-represented jobs have declined both nationally and in Oregon. The share of the state’s wage and salary workers covered by a union contract fell from 26% in 1983 to 15% in 2006. Over the 23-year period, union-represented jobs declined 14% from 262,000 to 225,000. Yet the share of the Beaver State’s wage and salary workers represented by unions ranked 18th highest of all states in 2006, lower than rankings in Washington and California, but slightly higher than the nation overall. Unions represent only 8% of private-sector employees nationally, but 40% of government employees. This shows up in the concentration of union workers by occupation. Education, training, library and protective-service employees are most likely to be represented by unions.


— Art Ayre, state employment economist
WorkSource Oregon Employment Department
www.QualityInfo.org

0507OEDchart.gif

Workers represented by unions, U.S. and selected states

Rank of
share
Area 1983 2006 1983-2006
percent change
2006 Share of
all workers*
U.S. 20,532,100 16,860,000 -18% 13%
1 Hawaii 124,900 146,000 17% 26%
3 Alaska 49,200 67,000 36% 24%
5 Washington 499,700 583,000 17% 21%
8 Nevada 106,700 191,000 79% 17%
9 California 2,505,200 2,444,000 -2% 17%
18 Oregon 261,900 225,000 -14% 15%
40 Idaho 53,700 45,000 -16% 7%
* Limited to wage and salary workers; omits self-employed. Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics



Have an opinion? E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

More Articles

Nuclear fingerprints

March 2015
Tuesday, February 24, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

At Oregon State University, a 21st century version of the bad dream — nuclear terrorism — is alive and well. This winter, the Department of Nuclear Physics and Radiation Health Physics created a new interdisciplinary graduate emphasis in nuclear forensics, a Sherlock Holmes-sounding program that aims to identify how and where confiscated nuclear and radiological materials were created.


Read more...

Beam Me Up

April 2015
Thursday, March 19, 2015
BY DAN COOK | Photos by Jason E. Kaplan

An alliance of developers, academics and timber industry executives wants to position Oregon as a front runner in the glamorous new world of wooden skyscrapers.


Read more...

Downtime with the president of NAI Norris, Beggs & Simpson

March 2015
Monday, February 23, 2015
BY JESSICA RIDGWAY | OB CONTRIBUTOR

Live, Work, Play: Catching up with Chris Johnson.


Read more...

Game On

March 2015
Wednesday, February 25, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

The big news at Oregon Business is we’re getting a ping pong table. After reading the descriptions of the 2015 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon, a disproportionate number of which feature table tennis in the office, I decided it was time to bring our own workplace into the 21st century. It was a tough call, but it’s lonely at the top, and someone has to make the hard decisions.


Read more...

How Oregon will survive the loss of Hanjin

March 2015
Friday, February 20, 2015
BY JOE CORTRIGHT | OB CONTRIBUTOR

"Shipping containers to Portland is like waiting for a bus that travels once a day."


Read more...

Grassroots movement pursues carbon bills

News
Tuesday, February 24, 2015
eventthumbBY KIM MOORE | OB RESEARCH EDITOR

A partnership of a grassroots environmental organization and a youth group is striving to build community and business support for carbon price legislation.


Read more...

5 questions about the FLIR FX

The Latest
Wednesday, April 08, 2015
FLIR-FX-IndoorBY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

The Wilsonville-based company is targeting GoPro enthusiasts with its latest release. Is spy gear poised to go mainstream?


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS