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Archives - May 2007
Tuesday, May 01, 2007

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If tax season left you reeling, consider this: Spokane-based Potlatch Corporation expects to have a $33.5 million loss after taxes on the sale of its hybrid poplar tree farm. The 17,000-acre farm recently sold to a private equity tree-farm investment fund for $65 million. Potlatch, a real-estate investment trust, owns about 1.5 million acres of forestland across the country as well as 13 manufacturing sites that produce lumber and bleached pulp products. Originally planted in 1992 to support the company’s fiber needs, the farm was later used to grow hardwood saw logs.

 

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