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Archives - June 2007
Friday, June 01, 2007


{safe_alt_text}Usually golf courses and senior citizen living options go together. Generally, though, they don’t share the same land. Due to increasing water supply issues, the Bottle Creek Golf Course could see a new life as an aging-in-place residential area if the city approves zoning changes. As general manager Mary Rentfro says, “There isn’t sufficient water for us to sustain a golf course.” After meeting with neighbors and discussing options the senior residential development emerged as the most popular idea. The golf course would turn into a mix of single-family dwellings and park areas. A care facility would also be built to assist older citizens, allowing residents to remain in their neighborhood even as their needs change, says Rentfro. After applying for a zone change this spring, owner Terry Kelly now must wait for the city’s approval before beginning a subdivision application.

A 146-acre site remains up for grabs after Wal-Mart declined to build a warehouse on state-owned Mill Creek land. Wal-Mart, which would have spent $140,000 per acre for the lot, would have been one of the first companies to begin developing at Mill Creek. Of the 650 acres, 515 are available for purchase, the rest set aside as a wetlands park. According to city manager Bob Wells, while the area is surplus state land it remains within the city’s urban renewal area. Salem will provide the infrastructure necessary for development such as water connections and streets.

Employees at Yamasa, an international company known for its soy sauce, moved into a new warehouse location adjacent to its existing facility. The 10,000-square-foot space cost a little more than $1.3 million to build, according to Yoshifumi Daikoku, manager of administration. Before obtaining the occupancy permit for the new warehouse in February, Yamasa was in leased space a mile away from its manufacturing facility. Daikoku says the  Salem facility is the only one in the U.S. to brew and package their soy sauce.

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