June 2007
Title Filter     Display # 
# Article Title
1 Cancer at the crossroads
2 Legislators take on health care system
3 Colleges struggle to meet health-care worker demand
4 When business and politics mix
5 The LNG debate
6 Congrats to Callahan’s
7 Deal Watch: The making of an onion giant
8 Wave energy projects face challenges
9 Capitol Gains: Pressure builds as legislature nears session's end
10 In Character: Diane Snyder of U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities
11 Cost saving: 10 (good) ways to cut corners
12 Sales: The importance of the one-minute pitch
13 HR: Select and handle supervisors with care
14 BAKER CITY
15 Reader survey finds lack of retirement saving
16 VIP: Conversation with Nike’s head of Global Women’s Fitness, Heidi O’Neill
17 The good and bad news of rising corn prices
18 Death of timber money births a rural study
19 Travel Oregon unveils two new websites
20 A new magazine for Prineville
21 Oregon Entrepreneurs Network brings angel investors online
22 Juan Valdez calls on Portland firm for a makeover
23 New biodegradable cups aren't clear to consumers
24 Gresham startup builds race-car for Cricket Wireless
25 LAKEVIEW
26 PRINEVILLE
27 PORTLAND
28 SALEM
29 ADAIR VILLAGE
30 CORVALLIS
31 SPRINGFIELD
32 SHADY COVE
33 MEDFORD
34 BROOKINGS
35 NEWPORT
36 SEASIDE
37 March '07 employment and business filing indicators
38 March '07 farming, natural resources and energy
39 March '07 transportation indicators
40 March '07 real estate and construction indicators
41 Oregon commodities heat up
42 Westerners, but not Oregonians, have heftier checks than elsewhere in U.S.
43 Marion County growth pushed by two sectors
 

More Articles

OB Poll: Wineries and groceries

News
Friday, October 24, 2014

24-winethumbA majority of respondents agreed: Local vineyards should remain Oregon-owned and quality is the most important factor when determining where to eat or buy groceries.


Read more...

Crowdfunding 2.0

News
Tuesday, December 02, 2014
120214-crowdfund-thumbBY LINDA BAKER

A conversation with attorney Erich Merrill about the latest way to raise money from large groups of people.


Read more...

The 100 Best Companies survey is open

News
Friday, October 24, 2014

100-best-logo-2015 500pxw-1How does your workplace stack up against competitors? How can you improve workplace practices to help recruit and retain employees? Find out by taking our 100 Best Companies to Work for in Oregon survey!


Read more...

Corner Office: Marv LaPorte

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

The president of LaPorte & Associates lets us in on his day-to-day life.


Read more...

The short list: 4 companies engaged in a battle of the paddles

The Latest
Thursday, December 04, 2014
pingpongthumbBY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Nothing says startup culture like a ping pong table in the office, lounge or lobby.


Read more...

Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


Read more...

Powerbook Perspective

January-Powerbook 2015
Friday, December 12, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

A conversation with Oregon state economist Josh Lehner.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS