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Archives - July 2007
Sunday, July 01, 2007

 

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Family-owned custom construction and technical welding company Pro Weld broke ground in May on a $1.2 million manufacturing plant. With 12,800 square feet, more than five times the size of its current facility, Pro Weld plans to triple its output and more than double its workforce in the next three years. The move will also mark a shift to more large-scale projects, such as interior structures for buildings and bridges. The company also hopes to take on statewide contracts as a preferred vendor for the Oregon Department of Transportation. Tanna Oberlander, company spokesperson, says, “Pro Weld is excited to pull in business outside our little town.” With projects as far away as Massachusetts and New York, Pro-Weld also plans to expand internationally.


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