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Archives - August 2007
Wednesday, August 01, 2007

t_Map.Beaverton

Just one year after upgrading to a larger headquarters facility, Enuclia Semiconductor closed its doors. The high-tech startup, which built computer chips for high-definition televisions, suffered a fatal blow after an undisclosed key investor pulled out of a $14 million investment involving two other venture capital firms at the last moment. Chip Burczak, president of Enuclia, says he feels uncertain about the future of high-tech startups in Oregon, saying that although talent exists, the money to fund the startups doesn’t. Brisk competition and rapid transitions in HDTV technology prove difficult for small cash-strapped companies, says Burczak. Enuclia laid off 53 workers, liquidated and transferred its assets to a secure creditor that will try to recover as many of the assets as possible.

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