Umatilla County shifts toward durables and services

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Archives - August 2007
Wednesday, August 01, 2007

As recently as 2001, non-durable goods manufacturing employment in Umatilla County outnumbered durable goods by more than two-to-one. Non-durables, dominated by large food manufacturing plants, lost a major employer in late 2004 and fell by roughly 600 jobs. Subsequent closures cost food manufacturing 160 jobs in 2006, lowering the non-durable goods average to 1,820. The losses were partially offset by growth in durable goods, especially transportation equipment. Durable goods gained 520 jobs (+40%) from 2001 to 2006, reaching an average of 1,810 jobs. But non-durables may grow again as Inland Pacific Energy Center purchased 487 acres of property near Stanfield for a proposed biodiesel and ethanol complex. Beyond manufacturing, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation will open Cayuse Technologies for business later this year. Once constructed, the 40,000-square-foot facility will house software development, document image processing and call center capabilities. The tribes will own Cayuse Technologies and Accenture will provide operational support.

— Dallas Fridley, regional economist
WorkSource Oregon Employment Department
www.QualityInfo.org

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