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What a Duck and Beaver like about each other

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Archives - September 2007
Saturday, September 01, 2007

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ARE YOU A DUCK OR BEAVER FAN? College pride runs deep and a healthy rivalry in attracting both students and research money helps boost both Oregon universities. But ever wonder what the presidents of these venerable academic institutions really think about the other’s school? Since any college freshman can rail against their rival, we stuck it to the presidents and asked Dave Frohnmayer, president of the University of Oregon, and Ed Ray, president of Oregon State University, their thoughts on the five best features of the opposing school — a new twist on a century-old rivalry.

What Dave likes about OSU:

  1. Its president. Ed Ray is smart, experienced, unselfish and a wise partner in the Oregon University System. He has a great sense of humor, a fabulous instinct for the issues and can still run a marathon.

  2. OSU’s passionate devotion to serving the constituencies for which it has been established. It takes seriously its land-grant, space-grant and sea-grant designations and is able to enlist a broad base of public support for its mission of service.

  3. The capacity of faculty to collaborate broadly and with high intellectual power across academic disciplines and with others — community colleges, the University of Oregon and other institutions in the new and exciting ONAMI initiatives. OSU shares a sense of needing to look beyond its own borders for allies in confronting the serious issues of the future.

  4. The beauty of its campus that strikes all faculty, students and visitors and seems to be just right for large flat-tailed rodents to wander.

  5. OSU’s sports, except for the days on which they are competing against the University of Oregon Ducks.

What Ed likes about UO:

  1. First on my list of what’s best about UO are the people, starting with Dave and Lynn Frohnmayer. They are warm, intelligent and caring and have helped make Beth and me feel welcome in Oregon. But there are many, many others, from Provost Linda Brady to chemistry professor Dave Johnson — all of them wonderful.

  2. UO models a spirit of friendship and collaboration in advancing learning, scholarship and service in higher education, both in Oregon and throughout the nation. Their work with OSU and other colleagues on our nanoscience collaboration (ONAMI), their participation on the Cascades Campus and partnership with OHSU and OSU on medical education are all great examples of that.

  3. The campus — I have actually walked through it numerous times (without the need for a disguise, I might add), and it’s a beautiful place. Newer buildings like the Law School and the College of Business make profound physical statements about the world-class programs they contain.

  4. Nationally and internationally celebrated programs in cognitive sciences, law, business, special education, chemistry and more are a rewarding reflection on UO.

  5. Finally, while my favorite colors are orange and black, I think emerald and gold is a snazzy combination. Much of the school gear and the elegant “O” logo are very attractive. My only criticism: Stop fussing with it so much. Once you get something right, leave it alone!


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