FEI Co. creates video game to popularize nanoscience

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Archives - September 2007
Saturday, September 01, 2007

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HILLSBORO Like many science and technology-oriented companies, the folks at FEI Company are prone to worries about where their next generation of workers is going to come from. But instead of just hand-wringing , they’re taking a swing at the problem. Working with a London-based game company, PlayGen, FEI helped put out a video game to make nanoscience as sexy as, well, stealing cars. FEI sponsored NanoScaling and NanoImaging, two modules in PlayGen’s NanoMission series of video games that promise to wow gamers with the “action-packed world of the nanoscale.” The game’s mission: image and identify dangerous organisms. The real mission: join the ranks of nano-geeks and get a job.

 

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