Irrigation’s role in Klamath fish kill disputed

| Print |  Email
Archives - September 2007
Saturday, September 01, 2007
{safe_alt_text}

THERE WAS ONE small but very important inaccurate statement in the August cover story [THE FIGHT FOR WATER] regarding the Klamath Basin: “It was the site of the biggest fish die-off in the history of the West because of an irrigation diversion.”

During late summer and early fall of 2002, Dave Vogel, a fisheries biologist, noted that water temperatures in the Klamath River were measured hourly just prior to and during the fall-run Chinook migration. He also found that large numbers of salmon entered the lower Klamath earlier than usual and were exposed to uncharacteristic cooling and warming conditions causing disease outbreak from warm water and crowded conditions.

“In my opinion the operations of Iron Gate Dam during the summer and fall of 2002 did not cause and could not have prevented the fish die-off in the lower Klamath River,”  Vogel reported.

Activists base many of their arguments on a California Department of Fish and Game report on the die-off. They consistently manage to avoid the unbiased National Research Council report on the same issue. The media also largely ignored a similar October 2003 finding by the National Research Council Committee, which failed to find a link between the operation of the Klamath Project and the fish die-off. The recent congressional hearing regarding Dick Cheney’s alleged involvement with Klamath River operational decisions effectively put many of the arguments raised to rest.

Dan Keppen
Family Farm Alliance
Klamath Falls


Have an opinion? E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

More Articles

The Good Hacker

May 2015
Friday, April 24, 2015
BY CHRIS HIGGINS

As digital security breaches skyrocket, a cybersleuth everyman takes center stage.


Read more...

On the Road

April 2015
Friday, March 27, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

My daughter turned 18 last week, and for her birthday I got her a Car2Go membership. Not to label myself a disruptor or anything, but it felt like a groundbreaking moment. The two of us, mother and child, were participating in a new teen rite of passage: Instead of handing over the car keys, I handed over a car-sharing card — with the caveat that she not use the gift as her own personal car service.


Read more...

6 things to know about the Amtrak Cascades route

The Latest
Friday, May 22, 2015
thumb3BY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

The recent tragedy in Philadelphia has called attention to Amtrak and the nation's woefully underfunded rail service. Here are six facts about the Amtrak Cascades corridor between Eugene and Vancouver B.C. 


Read more...

Can small be large?

Linda Baker
Wednesday, April 01, 2015
040115-lindablogthumbBY LINDA BAKER

Leaders in Oregon's ag sector gathered this morning in Portland’s Coopers Hall winery/taproom to discuss the role of the region as an export gateway, impediments to exporting products and solutions to containerized shipping challenges.


Read more...

Footloose

April 2015
Friday, March 27, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

Founded 12 years ago, Keen Inc. likes to push the envelope, starting with the debut of the “Newport” closed toe sandal in 2003. Since then, the company has opened a factory on Swan Island and a sleek new headquarters in the Pearl District. The brand’s newest offering, UNEEK, is a sandal made from two woven cords and not much more.


Read more...

The Road to Reinvention

April 2015
Friday, March 27, 2015
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

Damian Smith bets on changing himself — and Portland — through consulting.


Read more...

Beneath the Surface

May 2015
Thursday, April 23, 2015
0515-goodhacker01 250pxwBY LINDA BAKER

On April 1 I attended a forum at the University of Portland on the sharing economy. The event featured panelists from Lyft and Airbnb, as well as Portland Mayor Charlie Hales. Asked about the impact of tech-driven sharing economy services. Hales said the new business models are reshaping the landscape. “But,” he added, “I don’t pretend to understand how a lot of this [technology] works.” 


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS