Home Back Issues October 2007 Marine reserves rankle ports, fishermen

Marine reserves rankle ports, fishermen

| Print |  Email
Archives - October 2007
Monday, October 01, 2007

{safe_alt_text}

OREGON COAST A push by Gov. Ted Kulongoski to create a network of marine reserves off the coast by 2009 has sparked serious concern among some port officials. They say the process is moving at a pace that doesn’t allow for adequate study of how reserves would affect the state’s commercial and sport fishing industries.

This summer the specter of reserves large enough to shut down fishing along 100-mile stretches of coast was raised. A meeting in Charleston of the Marine Reserves Working Group (a subcommittee of the Oregon Ocean Policy Advisory Council, or OPAC) saw heated comments from county commissioners and fishermen that ranged from how preliminary economic and scientific studies would be funded to whether there was even a need for reserves at all.

In August, commissioners at the Port of Newport approved a resolution that gave a nod to the benefits of reserves but listed 10 points — issues raised at the meeting — they want addressed in the planning process. Other ports are considering similar resolutions.

“There’s a risk that we’re getting the cart before the horse,” Don Mann, Newport port manager says. “The biggest risk is that we’re missing the opportunity to do the process right.”

Frank Warrens, chair of the Marine Reserves Working Group, says that because the process has not been well-defined, people are justified in being angry, and it’s been made worse by a lack of communication. “The wheels are beginning to come off,” Warrens says.

Warrens, a former charter fisherman, says he’s made suggestions to the governor’s office that he think will create changes in the process, specifically in how to increase public input.

The push for reserves started in 2002 with former Gov. John Kitzhaber. There have been several iterations of the idea, including a defunct proposal by Kulongoski for a reserve that would blanket 25,000 square miles off the coast. OPAC recommended against that idea, which kicked off the current round of planning. Now Kulongoski wants OPAC to come up with new recommendations by 2008 or 2009.

Several port managers say the push by the governor is what’s driving the accelerated pace, and they say it drives home the perception that there is little consideration for an industry that fishermen feel has been under attack for more than a decade.

Mark Freeman, port manager at the Port of Siuslaw in Florence, says marine reserve policy decisions need to be made and reconciled, in part, by the fishing industry. “There’s really a feeling that they’re not trying to manage fishing but manage fishermen and women,” he says.

ABRAHAM HYATT

Have an opinion? E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

More Articles

I Know How You Feel

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JESSICA RIDGWAY

Most smartphones come equipped with speech recognition systems like Siri or Cortana that are capable of understanding the human voice and putting words into actions. But what if smartphones could do more? What if smartphones could register feeling?


Read more...

Launch

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY JESSICA RIDGWAY

October's Launch article features Soul Kitchen, Easy Company and Slick's Big Time BBQ.


Read more...

100 Best Nonprofits to Work for in Oregon [VIDEO]

News
Thursday, October 02, 2014

Screen shot 2014-10-02 at 11.17.21 AMMore than 5,500 employees from 180 organizations throughout the state participated in the 100 Best Nonprofits to Work for in Oregon project.


Read more...

Gone Girl

News
Monday, September 29, 2014
roundup-logo-thumb-14BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

Wehby disappears, Kitzhaber fails to disclose and Seattle gets bike share before Portland.


Read more...

Downtime

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JESSICA RIDGWAY

Bob Dethlefs, CEO of Evanta, balances work and play.


Read more...

The Bookseller

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

Everyone knows college is expensive, but a look at the numbers brings that into sharp — and painful — focus.


Read more...

Reimagining education to solve Oregon's student debt and underemployment problems

News
Thursday, November 13, 2014
carsonstudentdept-thumbBY RYAN CARSON | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

How do we skill up our future technology workforce in a smart way to take advantage of these high-paying jobs? The answer shouldn’t focus only on helping people get a bachelor’s degree.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS