Home Back Issues January 2008 Business travel: carry-on bag comparison

Business travel: carry-on bag comparison

| Print |  Email
Archives - January 2008
Tuesday, January 01, 2008

Here are Fink’s picks for business travelers:
ZeroHalliburton.jpg Zero Halliburton, 21” Polycarbonate 4-Wheel Zeroller ($275)
Shell is made of a polycarbonate, which makes the piece affordable, durable and lightweight. Integrated TSA lock system. Removable tri-fold suiter.
BriggsRiley.jpg Briggs & Riley, 22” Carry-On Superlight Upright ($299)
A light upright. Special pocket for hassle-free security checks. Built-in garment sleeve holds one or two suits. Good for a two- to four-day trip.
Pathfinder.jpg Pathfinder, Revolution 22” Auto-Expand Trolley ($249)
Affordable and well constructed. Expandability feature adds 30% packing capacity. Removable suiter. Good for three- to five-day trip.

In these days of long security lines and lost luggage, a good bag can make or break a business trip. Most business travelers prefer a carry-on, which minimizes the chance of airlines losing or mangling a bag. Emily Naslund-Smith, owner of Destinations-The Travel Store in Eugene, says she’s seen an increased interest in unconditional warranties for luggage. “Airlines can really do a number on bags,” she says.

Check size requirements for both domestic and international flights, as they often differ, and beware of weight limits, which will affect not only the size and type of bag you choose, but what you pack. Alex Fink, owner of Fink’s Luggage in Portland, says that a lighter bag means sacrificing durability as companies use lower-quality frames, parts and construction. He recently experienced success on a trip to Asia with a polycarbonate case that kept his suits crisp and weighed in under the limit.

In terms of security, Naslund-Smith recommends choosing a bag that offers easy access to two items: your laptop, which should be removed at the security gate, and the Ziploc bag filled with any containers carrying liquids (check tsa.gov for the latest restrictions). Also, consider using folders and cubes for your clothing when packing, which will make repacking after an encounter with a security screener a snap.         

LUCY BURNINGHAM


Have an opinion? E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

More Articles

Hipsters gone wild

June 2014
Thursday, May 29, 2014
BY JON BELL

A new generation of outdoor apparel companies targets the young and the urban.


Read more...

Powerlist: Credit Unions

June 2014
Thursday, May 29, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

A conversation about credit unions with the CEOs of Advantis Credit Union and OSU Federal Credit Union, followed by June's Powerlist.


Read more...

13 West Coast seafood species now 'sustainable'

News
Tuesday, June 03, 2014

Fishing OrBiz Fishing 0357 ADOBErgbCiting the transition to catch shares management as a key to rebuilding stocks and reducing bycatch, 13 species caught by the West Coast trawl fishery today earned designation from the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) as sustainable.


Read more...

Oregon Business wins awards

News
Monday, June 30, 2014

ASBPEOregon Business magazine won two silver awards for excellence in writing in the National American Society of Business Publication Editors Western region competition.


Read more...

Attack of the Robin Sages

Contributed Blogs
Monday, July 07, 2014
070714 thumb linkedinfakesBY TOM COX | OB BLOGGER

Named after the 2010 experiment by Thomas Ryan, "Robin Sages" are fake social media profiles designed to encourage linking and divulging valuable information.


Read more...

Moving the needle

June 2014
Thursday, May 29, 2014

I was in a rut. A few months ago, I was at my desk trying to come up with cover story ideas for our June “green” issue.  But I was stuck on a concept that is a bit too tried and true in the magazine business.


Read more...

Updated: Disrupting innovation

News
Tuesday, July 08, 2014
070814 thumb disputive-innovationBY LINDA BAKER  | OB EDITOR

The New Yorker recently published a sharply worded critique of “disruptive innovation,” one of the most widely cited theories in the business world today. The article raises questions about the descriptive value of disruption and innovation  — whether the terms are mere buzzwords or actually explain today's extraordinarily complex and fast changing business environment. 

Update: We caught up with Portland's Thomas Thurston, who shared his data driven take on the disruption controversy.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS