May 2008
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1 Housing downturn finds its way to Oregon
2 Startups: The beat goes on in Portland
3 CH2M Hill wins $5.25 billion contract on Panama Canal
4 Q&A with new state labor chief
5 Sauvie Island businesses survive bridge blues
6 Oregon manufacturers hone their edge
7 Spring, Botox in the air
8 Using retreats to advance your team
9 More executives turning to private jets
10 Easy, low-cost ways to keep employees healthier
11 Deal Watch: Making a splash with interactive ads
12 Online survey: Readers share their economic mood
13 Value of state’s prisons deserves broader view
14 Dispute between victims group and Pew Center
15 Next: the wood bike
16 Finding treasure in The Dalles
17 Graphic: Portland construction costs low compared to other cities
18 Gorge commission changes rules on development
19 Graphic: Federal hydroelectric projects in Oregon
20 New FAA policy could threaten kit plane makers
21 Ohio group wins oil and gas rights near Madras
22 Graphic: RV ownership among Oregonians aged 43-81
23 Big Look begins big schedule of meetings
24 Salmon season sunk by total closure
25 Feds fund job-training programs
26 Local officials resign over ethics law
27 Bend guitar-maker makes environmental commitment
28 Greenlight’s cluster focus
29 Non-tribal casino idea loses steam
30 Retail vacancies rise in Portland
31 Even slow-growing occupations will need workers
32 Port of Portland picks up steam
33 February '08 employment and business filing indicators
34 February '08 transportation indicators
35 February '08 real estate and construction indicators
36 February '08 farming, natural resources and energy indicators
37 Graphic: Best Companies stress wellness despite low importance to employees
 

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Reimagining education to solve Oregon's student debt and underemployment problems

News
Thursday, November 13, 2014
carsonstudentdept-thumbBY RYAN CARSON | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

How do we skill up our future technology workforce in a smart way to take advantage of these high-paying jobs? The answer shouldn’t focus only on helping people get a bachelor’s degree.


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Dan and Louis Oyster Bar opens up to a changing neighborhood

The Latest
Thursday, December 11, 2014
121114-oystervidBy MEGHAN NOLT

VIDEO: Revamping a Classic — an iconic eatery stays relevant in a changing marketplace.


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Free Falling

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, December 18, 2014
121714-oilprice-thumbBY JASON NORRIS | OB CONTRIBUTOR

The implosion of the energy complex: The best thing for low oil prices is low oil prices.


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The clean fuels opportunity

News
Monday, November 10, 2014
111014-dirtyfuel-thumbBY KIM MOORE | OB RESEARCH EDITOR

A market for low-carbon transportation fuels has a chance to flourish in Oregon if regulators adopt the second phase of the state’s Clean Fuels Program.


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Corner Office: Pam Edstrom

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

Seven tidbits of information from an agency partner and co-founder of Waggener Edstrom in Lake Oswego.


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The 100 Best Companies survey is open

News
Friday, October 24, 2014

100-best-logo-2015 500pxw-1How does your workplace stack up against competitors? How can you improve workplace practices to help recruit and retain employees? Find out by taking our 100 Best Companies to Work for in Oregon survey!


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Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


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