Home Back Issues September 2008 Top-paid CEOs in Oregon

Top-paid CEOs in Oregon

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Monday, September 01, 2008

CEOpayCharts

While many Oregon workers have resigned themselves to stagnant wages over the last few years in an uncertain economy, Oregon’s public company CEOs saw no income dip during the last fiscal year. For those with reported incomes during the last two years, average pay leapt 22% in 2007 to $2.1 million. Salary remains the largest chunk of their money pie, yet accounts for only about a quarter of their compensation. Other significant slices (in order of size) are option awards, non-equity incentive plans, stock awards and changes in pension value.

Coming off a lucrative year for the company, Precision Castparts CEO Mark Donegon is the leader of the pack. He earned almost $3 million more than relative newcomer Mark Parker, CEO of Nike, the most prominent company headquartered in Oregon. Schnitzer Steel’s John Carter, NW Natural’s Mark Dodson and StanCorp Financial’s Eric Parsons all followed close behind in the $4 million-plus range.

The average age of the list’s CEOs is 57. It includes only two women: Peggy Fowler (No. 10) of PGE and Cascade Bancorp’s Patricia Moss (No. 24). Four on the list are no longer serving as CEO, including Hans Olson (No. 16, Pixelworks), Mark Hollinger (No. 20, Merix Corp.), Denis Burger (No. 23, AVI Biopharma) and Eric Strid (No. 40, Cascade Microtech).                    

BRANDON SAWYER

GO TO CEO PAY LIST




TOP CEO PAY BY THE NUMBERS TOTAL AVERAGE
TOTAL COMPENSATION: $82,290,463 $2,057,262
SALARY: $22,034,307 $550,858
BONUS: $6,278,602 $156,965
STOCK AWARD: $11,966,790 $306,841
OPTION AWARD: $17,623,510 $440,588
NON-EQUITY PLAN INCENTIVE: $14,650,251 $366,256
CHANGE IN PENSION VALUE: $7,134,868 $178,372
ALL OTHER COMPENSATION: $2,602,135 $65,053




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