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Employment services industry is shedding jobs monthly

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Archives - October 2008
Wednesday, October 01, 2008

The employment services industry provided about 40,800 jobs in Oregon in July 2008. Between 1990 and 2007, the industry grew four times as fast as all private-sector employment. Most of that job growth was in temporary help agencies, which now dominate the industry with nearly 90% of the jobs. The balance includes jobs in professional employer organizations that lease employees to businesses and in a small number of employment placement agencies. Temporary and leased employees work for their respective agency but work in businesses in a wide range of other industries such as manufacturing, construction and health care. In one day in August 2008, nearly 150 temporary agencies listed job openings with the Oregon Employment Department for positions including circuit board assembler, technical writer, industrial painter, production printer and clean-room technician. Recent trends point downward: In every month since December 2006, the employment services industry has declined from its year-earlier employment.

— Pamela Ferrara
Worksource Oregon Employment analyst

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