Sponsored by Oregon Business

State slams FERC’s LNG approval

| Print |  Email
Archives - October 2008
Wednesday, October 01, 2008

BradwoodLanding Its isolated location and industrial zoning makes Bradwood Landing — a once-bustling mill town — a highly desirable location for NorthernStar Natural Gas.

ASTORIA In mid September, federal officials approved a controversial liquid natural gas project located on the Columbia River and in doing so set the stage for a potential legal battle between the state of Oregon and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

Moments after FERC announced its approval of the Bradwood Landing project — which consists of a $580 million terminal 20 miles upriver from Astoria and a 36-mile-long pipeline that would stretch east to Kelso — Gov. Ted Kulongoski slammed the agency.

“Moving forward with this project as is — which is incomplete — disregards states’ rights in this process,” he said in a statement. “If legal action is necessary to compel FERC to do this right, I am prepared to exercise that option.”

It’s unclear when the situation might reach that point. The state has asked FERC for a new approval hearing, the final step before legal steps are taken. The public also has 30 days to appeal the FERC’s decision.

The Bradwood Landing saga began three years ago when Texas-based NorthernStar Natural Gas announced it would take super-cooled liquid natural gas imported via ship from Africa, the Middle East and Indonesia, warm it to a gaseous form in a $580 million terminal, and transport it through pipelines to Oregon, Washington and California.

NorthernStar and FERC officials argue the project is crucial in helping the Pacific Northwest meet its growing natural gas needs. But Kulongoski, environmental groups and Clatsop County residents argue FERC hasn’t adequately considered environmental issues associated with the project. There are other challenges as well: The same week FERC handed down its decision, Clatsop County overwhelmingly voted to ban pipelines from crossing certain types of land. (Northern Star says the ballot measure isn’t legally valid.)

In their approval, FERC commissioners countered each of the challenges offered by Kulongoski and others. But those rebuttals weren’t sufficient for the governor. “The commission has decided to ignore the law and instead, approve a project with incomplete mitigation plans and without regard to Oregon’s important concerns,” he said in his statement.

As options for a peaceful resolution of those concerns disappear, the pressure, like an over-filled tank of natural gas, is building.


Have an opinion? E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


More Articles

Salad Days

October 2015
Monday, September 28, 2015

How Portland's Garden Bar plans to become the Starbucks of salad.



November/December 2015
Wednesday, October 28, 2015

The world's second-largest wind energy project yields costs and benefits for a sheep-farming family in Eastern Oregon.


The God complex

Linda Baker
Wednesday, September 30, 2015
093015-zydellren-thumbBY LINDA BAKER | EDITOR

The media coverage about Pope Francis must have put me in a Biblical frame of mind. Because after touring the latest phase of the South Waterfront development, a mind boggling 1.5 million square feet of office and retail space that will spring up north of the aerial tram over the next few years, I couldn’t stop thinking about the massive project as a modern day creation story.


Cutting Edge

October 2015
Monday, September 28, 2015

“There wasn’t a reason shaving with a straight razor should have been taken over by shaving with disposable razors.”


Rail revival

Linda Baker
Wednesday, November 11, 2015
111115-OregonShortLineRailCarTHUMBBY LINDA BAKER

“What we’ve seen traditionally over the past few decades is a reduction of short line railroads. This is a rare opportunity to see a line being opened.”


Photo Log: #TillamookSmile

The Latest
Friday, October 30, 2015
103015-cheesethumbBY CHRIS NOBLE | ART DIRECTOR

Against a changing backdrop Patrick Criseter’s infectious grin remained constant. It’s a cheesy (pun intended) beam that begs for a hashtag.


100 Best Nonprofits: Working for equality inside and out

October 2015
Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Striving for social equity is the mission of many nonprofits, and this year’s 100 Best Nonprofits to Work For in Oregon survey shows employees are most satisfied with their organizations’ fair treatment of differing racial, gender, disability, age and economic groups. But as a national discourse about racial discrimination and equity for low-income groups takes center stage, data show Oregon’s 100 Best Nonprofits to Work For still need to make progress on addressing these issues within their own organizations.

Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02