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March 2009

Recyclers say e-waste law won't mean profit

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Archives - March 2009
Sunday, March 01, 2009
ewaste.jpgOregon's new electronic waste law has recyclers bracing for a surge in e-waste this year. But the recession and a plunge in commodity prices could turn the law's first year into a bitter pill for the state's recycling industry.
 

Lending mixed at Oregon's TARP banks

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Archives - March 2009
Sunday, March 01, 2009
Oregon's slice of the Troubled Assets Relief Program has been meager. But that's not necessarily a bad thing, because the banks that got TARP money haven't been moving it through the economy any more ambitiously than the banks who passed on it.
 

Q&A with Willamette Valley Vineyards' president

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Archives - March 2009
Sunday, March 01, 2009
JimBernau.jpgWhen Jim Bernau founded Willamette Valley Vineyards in 1983, his 15-acre, one-man operation was one of about 115 vineyards dotting Oregon’s landscape.
 

30,000 employees have spoken

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Archives - March 2009
Sunday, March 01, 2009
0309Cover.jpgWhat makes a great place to work? This year’s winners of our 16th annual 100 Best Companies show the way.
 

No. 1 small company: Rose City Mortgage

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Archives - March 2009
Sunday, March 01, 2009
RoseCityMortgage.jpgWhen you walk into the office of Rose City Mortgage, it has the warm embrace of home. CEO Renee Spears pads around in her socks and sweats, good-luck Buddhas are sprinkled about and dogs are nearby.
 

No. 1 medium company: Slayden Construction

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Archives - March 2009
Sunday, March 01, 2009
SlaydenConstruction.jpgWhen Todd Woodley and Greg Huston took over Slayden Construction in 2002, they inherited a solid family business with a strong record of placing power in the hands of employees.
 

No. 1 large company: Hitachi Consulting

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Archives - March 2009
Sunday, March 01, 2009
HitachiConsulting.jpgIt was 2002 and for a handful of business management and IT consultants in Portland, it was the worst possible nightmare. The company they worked for, Arthur Andersen, one of the storied "Big Five" accounting firms, was imploding.
 
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