March 2009
Title Filter     Display # 
# Article Title
1 December '08 employment and business indicators
2 December '08 transportation indicators
3 December '08 real estate and construction indicators
4 December '08 farming, natural resources and energy indicators
5 Twilight sets on Oregon as film heads to Canada
6 Recyclers say e-waste law won't mean profit
7 Lending mixed at Oregon's TARP banks
8 Q&A with Willamette Valley Vineyards' president
9 30,000 employees have spoken
10 No. 1 small company: Rose City Mortgage
11 No. 1 medium company: Slayden Construction
12 No. 1 large company: Hitachi Consulting
13 The 2009 100 Best Companies List
14 The 2009 Top 33 Large Companies to Work For in Oregon
15 The 2009 Top 34 Medium Companies to Work For in Oregon
16 The 2009 Top 33 Small Companies to Work For in Oregon
17 The perks of the 100 Best
18 100 Best category winners, methodology and index
19 The 100 Best heroes
20 Tactics: Dutch Bros. rejects the corporate grind
21 Business travel: cutting the carbon footprint
22 Watch out for the work spouses
23 Economist Joe Cortright urges weatherizing jobs
24 Deal Watch: Solar panel firm XsunX bags $10 million deal
25 Wood products jobs chopped by one-sixth
26 Bankruptcies erupt again
27 Readers reveal their media habits
28 Vestas’ last promise of 1,000 jobs didn’t happen
29 Rail problems east, south have few answers, many obstacles
30 There’s room at the inn as lodging industry feels drop
31 Bet on it: Lottery says it will deliver its $1.324 billion
32 Cities delay fees to boost building
33 Oregon unions gain members, face uncertain future growth
34 Continued job loss runs through all industries
35 Huge patent backlog saps research and startup energy
36 Hood River economy holds steady
37 102 years later, still shucking along
38 Uncle Ben says: Buy bonds to help Oregon
39 Grant struggles with highest unemployment
40 Website aims to streamline business process
41 Graphic: Oregon university enrollment
42 Graphic: Oregon farm potato sales by county
43 Graphic: TriMet moves more than 100 million riders
44 Graphic: Government jobs grow in 2008
45 Next: the earthquake-proof wine rack
46 Powerlist: General contractors
 

More Articles

Corner Office: Marv LaPorte

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

The president of LaPorte & Associates lets us in on his day-to-day life.


Read more...

Growing a mobility cluster

News
Friday, October 31, 2014
0414 bikes bd2f6052BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

Why are there so few transportation startups in Portland?  The city’s leadership in bike, transit and pedestrian transportation has been well-documented.  But that was then — when government and nonprofits paved the way for a new, less auto centric way of life.


Read more...

Three problems with Obama's immigration order

News
Wednesday, November 26, 2014

BY NISHANT BHAJARIA | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR112614-immigration-thumb

By now, anyone who knows about it has a position on President Obama’s executive order on immigration. The executive order is the outcome of failed attempts at getting a bill through the normal legislative process. Both Obama and his predecessor came close, but not close enough since the process broke down multiple times.


Read more...

Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


Read more...

Dan and Louis Oyster Bar opens up to a changing neighborhood

The Latest
Thursday, December 11, 2014
121114-oystervidBy MEGHAN NOLT

VIDEO: Revamping a Classic — an iconic eatery stays relevant in a changing marketplace.


Read more...

Corner Office: Pam Edstrom

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

Seven tidbits of information from an agency partner and co-founder of Waggener Edstrom in Lake Oswego.


Read more...

OB Poll: Wineries and groceries

News
Friday, October 24, 2014

24-winethumbA majority of respondents agreed: Local vineyards should remain Oregon-owned and quality is the most important factor when determining where to eat or buy groceries.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS