Sponsored by Energy Trust
March 2009
Title Filter     Display # 
# Article Title
1 December '08 employment and business indicators
2 December '08 transportation indicators
3 December '08 real estate and construction indicators
4 December '08 farming, natural resources and energy indicators
5 Twilight sets on Oregon as film heads to Canada
6 Recyclers say e-waste law won't mean profit
7 Lending mixed at Oregon's TARP banks
8 Q&A with Willamette Valley Vineyards' president
9 30,000 employees have spoken
10 No. 1 small company: Rose City Mortgage
11 No. 1 medium company: Slayden Construction
12 No. 1 large company: Hitachi Consulting
13 The 2009 100 Best Companies List
14 The 2009 Top 33 Large Companies to Work For in Oregon
15 The 2009 Top 34 Medium Companies to Work For in Oregon
16 The 2009 Top 33 Small Companies to Work For in Oregon
17 The perks of the 100 Best
18 100 Best category winners, methodology and index
19 The 100 Best heroes
20 Tactics: Dutch Bros. rejects the corporate grind
21 Business travel: cutting the carbon footprint
22 Watch out for the work spouses
23 Economist Joe Cortright urges weatherizing jobs
24 Deal Watch: Solar panel firm XsunX bags $10 million deal
25 Wood products jobs chopped by one-sixth
26 Bankruptcies erupt again
27 Readers reveal their media habits
28 Vestas’ last promise of 1,000 jobs didn’t happen
29 Rail problems east, south have few answers, many obstacles
30 There’s room at the inn as lodging industry feels drop
31 Bet on it: Lottery says it will deliver its $1.324 billion
32 Cities delay fees to boost building
33 Oregon unions gain members, face uncertain future growth
34 Continued job loss runs through all industries
35 Huge patent backlog saps research and startup energy
36 Hood River economy holds steady
37 102 years later, still shucking along
38 Uncle Ben says: Buy bonds to help Oregon
39 Grant struggles with highest unemployment
40 Website aims to streamline business process
41 Graphic: Oregon university enrollment
42 Graphic: Oregon farm potato sales by county
43 Graphic: TriMet moves more than 100 million riders
44 Graphic: Government jobs grow in 2008
45 Next: the earthquake-proof wine rack
46 Powerlist: General contractors
 

More Articles

Election Season

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014

We didn’t intend this issue to have an election season theme. But politics has a way of seeping into the cracks and fissures.


Read more...

Reimagining education to solve Oregon's student debt and underemployment problems

News
Thursday, November 13, 2014
carsonstudentdept-thumbBY RYAN CARSON | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

How do we skill up our future technology workforce in a smart way to take advantage of these high-paying jobs? The answer shouldn’t focus only on helping people get a bachelor’s degree.


Read more...

The short list: 5 companies making a mint off kale

The Latest
Thursday, November 20, 2014
kale-thumbnailBY OB STAFF

Farmers, grocery stores and food processors cash in on kale.


Read more...

Two Sides of the Coin

Contributed Blogs
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
22 twosidesBY JASON NORRIS

Historically, when the leaves fall, so do the markets. This year, earnings, Europe, energy and Ebola have in common? Beyond alliteration, they are four factors that the investors are pointing to for this year’s seasonal volatility.


Read more...

Corner Office: Timothy Mitchell

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

A look-in on the life of Norris & Stevens' president.


Read more...

Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


Read more...

Tackling the CEO-worker pay gap

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014
BY OREGON BUSINESS STAFF

An SEC rule targets the disparity between executive and employee compensation, reigniting a long-standing debate about corporate social responsibility.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS