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What I'm Reading: Max Miller & William Rutherford

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Articles - May 2014
Monday, April 28, 2014

Books MaxMillerMax Miller
Attorney, Tonkon Torp 

“Along with practicing environmental and natural-resources law, I devote time and energy to local arts and artists, and also to local sustainability initiatives. So I like to read Howard Gardner and Daniel Pink, and local poets like Kim Stafford and John Morrison. On my stand, as well as on my desk and iPhone, are a couple of different translations of the Bible, because the word of God is, well, the word of God, and the Bible instructs everything I do.”

Books Julia-Cover-Large 

Julia Child Rules: Lessons on Savoring Life 
By Karen Karbo

“If you like to dig into biographies to find nuggets that you can put into practice, Karbo does that for you by expounding upon what we might all learn — besides cooking — from Julia Child: work hard, play incessantly, marry forever, always remember that successes are often just whims diligently fulfilled. The book seamlessly weaves together the life story of Julia Child and the influence she had on post war American cooking and culture, as well as on Karbo.”

 
 Books The-Evangelicals-You-Don-t-Know-Introducing-the-N The Evangelicals You Don’t Know: Introducing the Next Generation of Christians
By Tom Krattenmaker

“As a ‘token’ politically and culturally liberal member of a relatively conservative evangelical church, I was immediately drawn into [this] book. Krattenmaker introduces us to a generation of evangelical leaders who are politically either neutral or liberal and are heeding Jesus’ call to assist the poor and protect the children and widows; and to reintroduce civil discourse into the lexicon of theologically conservative Christians. This book will certainly bend the perception of any reader that automatically equates Christians and the Religious Right. The book features several people and organizations with Portland ties, and topics include faith, service, homophobia, ecology, healthcare and science. Evangelical readers of his book will find several faults with Krattenmaker’s understanding of the biblical bases and motivations of the people and trends he is reporting on. But if these new evangelicals are really as open-minded as he proclaims, they will forgive him for his theological misconceptions and honor him for his insights.”


Books Bill-Rutherford-pictureWilliam Rutherford
Founder and portfolio manager, Rutherford Investment Management

“I read prodigiously and omnivorously, but unfortunately not often for pleasure. Each day they are published, I read The Oregonian, The New York Times, Investor’s Business Daily, London’s Financial Times, Barron’s online and weekly publication the Wall Street Journal online and the London Economist. These publications are requisite reading for effectively managing investments for my clients. I would like to do more casual reading too, but research on finance takes up a great deal of my time.”

Books Sycamore Row - cover art of hardcover book by John Grisham 

Sycamore Row
By John Grisham

“This best-seller is a sequel to A Time to Kill, also a best-seller. Grisham is a great storyteller, and this book is no exception. The book features Jack Brigance, the lead character in A Time to Kill, and the usual collection of a trial in a Southern court with a Southern judge, Southern justice and racial tensions. It’s a good yarn.”

 Books Commodore-Renehan-Jr-Edward-EB9780465010301 Commodore: The Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt 
By Edward J. Renehan Jr. 

“This rather lengthy volume is a detailed biography that begins with speculation on the origins of the Van der Bilt family in Holland and their subsequent immigration to the U.S. Cornelius was born May 27, 1794, to very humble beginnings and became one of the richest men in the nation. Starting with a small boat plying the waters around Manhattan, Vanderbilt built an empire of shipping and railroads. When he died, he left about $100 million in 1877 dollars to his son.”

 

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