Cloud power

| Print |  Email
Articles - May 2014
Monday, April 28, 2014

Meanwhile, the ranks of new cloud businesses continue to grow. Among the class of 2013 at the Wieden+Kennedy-hosted Portland Incubator Experiment, four of the seven companies — Cloneless, Orchestrate, Smart Mocha and Teak — offer cloud-based services directed at businesses. Other Portland startups in the sector attracting venture capital include Snapflow, which helps companies quickly develop Web and mobile applications, and Nouvola, which offers a testing platform for online businesses. 

Cloud BD2F7775 
 Paola Moretto, co-founder of Nouvola

As the director of software for Intel’s cloud segment, Nouvola co-founder Paola Moretto became inspired by the testing needs of clients like Google and Facebook, with the latter once requesting 16,000 servers to run simulations. “Even at Intel, I don’t have 16,000 servers in my backyard to play with,” she says. Her experience corralling that volume of resources from different data centers led her to create Nouvola with a former University of California-Berkley classmate, who also came to the U.S. from Italy to pursue a career in technology in the mid-1990s.

Their creation, which won $250,000 at the Bend Venture Conference in October, can throw potentially crash-inducing levels of traffic at online businesses as they run tests in advance of real usage spikes. On an overcast Saturday in a Pearl District cafe, Moretto cast her company as a solution to just one of many similar challenges that Portland companies are stepping in to fix.

“There is a lot happening around the cloud,” she says. “Let’s make it bigger. Portland can really become a center of excellence for cloud technologies, and we have to think big.”

Recruiting skilled people, while still difficult, is much easier and more affordable in Oregon than it is in the Bay Area, says Moretto, who joined Kersten and Ellis in noting that Portland offers a desirable lifestyle that also helps entice talent. They say the presence of other cloud-focused companies has boosted the confidence of investors in recent years, while Portland’s reputation for tech collaboration is burnished by playing frequent host to the O’Reilly Open Source Convention.

In recent months, one of the fastest-growing open-source efforts among Portland programmers has formed around a cloud technology called OpenStack. The city hosted a national conference on the technology last year. And since the third quarter of 2013, a group formed by Al Kari around OpenStack has grown to include 120 people and sponsorship from companies like Suse, Puppet Labs and Jama Software. OpenStack is essentially a free operating system for server networks that NASA and Rackspace created in 2010. Since then, it has sparked a worldwide effort to create a common platform for building private and public clouds, freeing customers from the proprietary limitations of Amazon AWS and its competitors.

But for Kari, the project also represents a catalyst for disruptive technological change. The innovation and cost savings attributable to the cloud will only accelerate as service providers race to make remote computing cheaper and more prolific. The upshot for consumers, he says, will eventually be products as intuitive and interconnected as the all-knowing computer on Star Trek.

“Intelligence as a service is our ultimate goal — to actually utilize the technology the way we see in science fiction,” Kari says.

No one can say for sure when that will arrive, but Kari insists it’s not far off. After all, we already live in a world where the creator of a novel online service can test it with thousands of computers simultaneously, using little more than a laptop and the right subscription. It won’t be long before similar technology reaches outside of IT and further into everyday life, driving our cars, analyzing our medical records for unseen health risks and empowering even the simplest devices with an expanding universe of raw computing power in the cloud.



 

More Articles

Portland’s long-distance bike commuters

The Latest
Monday, August 03, 2015
Matt KellyresizethumbBY KIM MOORE | RESEARCH EDITOR

Pushing the extreme.


Read more...

Storyteller in Chief: Natural Prophets

July/August 2015
Monday, July 13, 2015
BY SAM BLACKMAN

Storyteller-in-chief with the CEO and co-founder of Elemental Technologies.


Read more...

Back to School

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
BY CHRIS NOBLE

Oregon is home to an abundance of gritty warehouses reborn as trendy office spaces, as well as crafty hipsters turned entrepreneurs. Does the combination yield an equally bounteous office products sector? Not so much. Occupying the limited desk jockey space are Field Notes, a spinoff of Portland’s Draplin Design Company, and Schuttenworks, known for whittling Apple device stands. For a full complement of keyboard trays, docking stations and mouse pads, check out the GroveMade line, guaranteed to boost the cachet of even the lowliest cubicle drone. 


Read more...

Car be gone

Linda Baker
Thursday, August 06, 2015
070615car2goblogthumbBY LINDA BAKER

Car and ride sharing services have taken urban areas by storm. Low-income and suburban communities are left at the curb.


Read more...

Up on the Roof

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

In 2010 Vanessa Keitges and several investors purchased Portland-based Columbia Green Technologies, a green-roof company. The 13-person firm has a 200% annual growth rate, exports 30% of its product to Canada and received its first infusion of venture capital in 2014 from Yaletown Venture Partners. CEO Keitges, 40, a Southern Oregon native who serves on President Obama’s Export Council, talks about market innovation, scaling small business and why Oregon is falling behind in green-roof construction. 


Read more...

Reader Input: School Choice

September 2015
Thursday, August 20, 2015

Which of the following would be most effective in reducing the cost of operating a public university in Oregon?


Read more...

Inside the Box

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
BY GINA BINOLE

Screening for “culture fit” has become an essential part of the hiring process. But do like-minded employees actually build strong companies — or merely breed consensus culture?


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS